Definition of slump in English:

slump

Line breaks: slump
Pronunciation: /slʌmp
 
/

verb

[no object]
1 [with adverbial] Sit, lean, or fall heavily and limply: she slumped against the cushions (be slumped) Denis was slumped in his seat
More example sentences
  • Kait sighed and slumped her shoulders, leaning her forehead against the door frame.
  • He slumped heavily into his armchair and busied himself with his smoking accoutrements.
  • As his shoulders slumped again, David leaned forward and took his face in his hands.
Synonyms
sit heavily, flop, flump, collapse, sink, fall, subside; sag, slouch
informal plonk oneself, plop oneself
2Undergo a sudden severe or prolonged fall in price, value, or amount: land prices slumped
More example sentences
  • When growth slowed, and share prices slumped, they were unable to raise money for further expansion.
  • The idea was to build up a substantial European mining company but copper prices slumped in 1997.
  • As commodities such as coffee or soya flooded into the world market, prices slumped, causing more economic chaos.
Synonyms
fall steeply, plummet, plunge, tumble, drop, go down, slide, decline, decrease; reach a new low
informal crash, nosedive, take a nosedive, go into a tailspin
2.1Fail or decline substantially: United slumped to another one-nil defeat
More example sentences
  • However, he slumped to a 75, Westwood shot 65 and beat his friend by three clear strokes.
  • However, Saunders' side slumped to a 2-1 defeat in a match that proved just how fickle they were.
  • Three of the top four in the A Section must be cursing their luck, as they slumped to defeats against opposition from the wrong half of the table.
Synonyms
decline, deteriorate, degenerate, worsen, get worse, slip, lapse
informal go downhill, go to pot, go to the dogs, nosedive, take a nosedive

noun

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1A sudden severe or prolonged fall in the price, value, or amount of something: a slump in profits
More example sentences
  • Niedermeier attributed the slump to the price falls in most local shares.
  • These have been compounded by the huge slump in share price values that most analysts predict will not be recovered.
  • Also, a slump in property prices could mean your retirement taking a big hit, or being forced to wait until the housing market recovers.
Synonyms
1.1A prolonged period of abnormally low economic activity, typically bringing widespread unemployment: he had survived two world wars and a slump [mass noun]: periods of slump
More example sentences
  • The world was mired in economic slump, which brought with it mass unemployment and wage cuts.
  • The domestic economy is in a slump, and unemployment in Hualien is particularly serious.
  • Two things did more than anything to usher in a new upturn in struggle - the black nationalist message of Marcus Garvey and the economic slump of the Great Depression.
Synonyms
recession, economic decline, depression, slowdown, trough, credit crunch; stagnation, stagflation; hard times
informal bust
1.2A period of substantial failure or decline: Arsenal’s recent slump
More example sentences
  • The station has seen a recent slump in numbers due to people leaving through retirement or ill health.
  • Hundreds of thousands of tourists flock to the area each year and despite the recent slump in tourism local hoteliers are reaping the benefits of Sundberg's visit.
  • The grouse population has traditionally been prone to yearly fluctuations, but global warming is being blamed in some quarters for a sustained slump in numbers.

Origin

late 17th century (in the sense 'fall into a bog'): probably imitative and related to Norwegian slumpe 'to fall'.

Derivatives

slumpy

adjective
More example sentences
  • Pity the young, for whose benefit they marched, for what are they to do in a free market that considers them excess labour in a slumpy economy?
  • Where should we put our money then to save for retirement if a slumpy economy comes to pass?
  • His spent his off season shipping of the slugger for the scrappy but slumpy speedster.

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