Definition of snail in English:

snail

Line breaks: snail
Pronunciation: /sneɪl
 
/

noun

1A mollusc with a single spiral shell into which the whole body can be withdrawn.
  • Many species in the class Gastropoda
More example sentences
  • Large or small, landlubbers or seafarers or both, hermit crabs have one feature in common: they generally spend their lives inside the empty shells of snails or other mollusks.
  • As gardeners already know, all other slugs and snails (or gastropod mollusks, to the experts) sport a soft and slimy foot.
  • For most species of snails, shells and body plans curl in only one direction.
1.1Used in reference to something very slow: he drove at a snail’s pace
More example sentences
  • A ship, slower than a snail, is crossing the sea.
  • Your internet connection is slow as a snail and your telephone makes buzzing noises.
  • When this kicks in, the PC can slow to a snails ' pace.

Origin

Old English snæg(e)l, of Germanic origin; related to German Schnecke.

Derivatives

snail-like

adjective
More example sentences
  • Together with Mr Schröder, the French president will now attempt to slow further the already snail-like pace of liberalisation of the energy and telecoms markets.
  • Instead of a swift inquiry, and a swift resolution, its pace was snail-like.
  • The implant consists of electronics and a thin set of wires containing pads that are designed to touch and stimulate the auditory nerve that lies exposed inside the snail-like cochlea of the inner ear.

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