There are 2 definitions of snarl in English:

snarl1

Line breaks: snarl
Pronunciation: /snɑːl
 
/

verb

[no object]
1(Of an animal such as a dog) make an aggressive growl with bared teeth: (as adjective snarling) snarling alsatians
More example sentences
  • It was the most horrendous place, because it was so savage, Alsatian dogs were snarling at you all the time, there was hardly any food.
  • Papa's Yorkshire terrier was tied in the truck bed and when one of the elephants walked by, the dog snarled and snapped, straining at the end of her chain.
  • A dog snarled at us viciously but he was caged and couldn't get at us.
Synonyms
growl, show its teeth
1.1 [reporting verb] (Of a person) say something in an angry, bad-tempered voice: I used to snarl at anyone I disliked [with direct speech]: ‘Shut your mouth!’ he snarled [with object]: he snarled a few choice remarks at them
More example sentences
  • Jeremy could almost hear the voice of his stepfather snarling the words as he read them, and he felt his rage building.
  • Jumping at the start of her cell phone, Laura snarled into the receiver upon opening it in an angry Russian,
  • She was snarling as if these were quite horrid things to say.
Synonyms
say/speak roughly, say/speak brusquely, say/speak nastily, say/speak angrily, bark, snap, growl, fling, hurl; lash out at; round on someone
informal jump down someone's throat, fly off the handle at

noun

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An act or sound of snarling: a snarl of rage
More example sentences
  • A snarl sounded behind him, and Carl's body snapped backward.
  • An owl hooted mysteriously, but was silenced by the sound of a low snarl followed by a thud.
  • She could hear the sounds of barks and snarls behind her as she turned a corner.

Origin

late 16th century: extension of obsolete snar, of Germanic origin; related to German schnarren 'rattle, snarl', probably imitative.

Derivatives

snarler

noun
More example sentences
  • When liberals gave Rice hell during her confirmation hearing, the right-wing snarlers of cable TV pounced on Oliphant's rendition.

snarlingly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Whenever the subject of the war comes up, the hosts - to a one - are snarlingly hostile to any critic, and utterly toadying to the Bush administration.
  • During an altercation with some soldiers, Joaquin is killed when confronted by Captain Love (a snarlingly evil Matt Letscher) and Alejandro decides to drown his sorrows in beer, a temporary solution if ever there was one.
  • Ineffably cool and snarlingly righteous, it blows initially-impressive recent efforts by both Massive Attack and Primal Scream into the water simply by means of having something to say and a definite way to say it.

snarly

adjective (snarlier, snarliest)
More example sentences
  • Cheney's tone, of course, is a snarly bass growl.
  • It doesn't have any of these snarly, ratty, great farfisa sounds that the real instrument did.
  • The words were short and to the point, yet profoundly eloquent, spoken in a loud and snarly voice spiced with a few adjectives not appropriate for the ears of young stick-handlers.

Definition of snarl in:

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Word of the day vituperate
Pronunciation: vɪˈtjuːpəreɪt
verb
blame or insult (someone) in strong language...

There are 2 definitions of snarl in English:

snarl2

Line breaks: snarl
Pronunciation: /snɑːl
 
/

verb

[with object]
1 (snarl something up) Entangle something: the trailing lead got snarled up in a bramble bush
More example sentences
  • There were the usual murmurings about congestion snarling up the M8 which had delayed some making the trip from Edinburgh to the Glasgow Hilton.
  • We would like to suggest that the LCC comes up with a system of levy collection which will not snarl up traffic and cause congestion. One suggestion would be pre-payments by all the minibuses that use Kulima Tower bus station.
  • For some time, the roads were clear, but after the meet petered out at around 7.30 pm, the return of the protesters in vans and buses once again snarled up traffic during peak evening hours.
Synonyms
tangle, entangle, entwine, enmesh, ravel, knot, twist, intertwine, jumble, muddle, foul
1.1Hinder or impede something: the coach became snarled up in traffic a heavy backlog of cases has snarled up the court process
2Decorate (metalwork) with raised shapes by hammering the underside.

noun

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A knot or tangle: snarls of wild raspberry plants
More example sentences
  • She looked like a child brought up by wolves in the forest; her long brown hair was a tangle of snarls, surrounding a face all bones and angles.
  • At some point, all tapestries encounter setbacks: snarls and kinks that tangle or block the work.
  • They brushed her hair until it was straight and there were no more snarls or knots.

Origin

late Middle English (in the senses 'snare, noose' and 'catch in a snare'): from snare.

Definition of snarl in: