There are 2 main definitions of snook in English:

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snook1

Line breaks: snook
Pronunciation: /snuːk
 
/

noun

A large edible game fish of the Caribbean which is sometimes found in brackish water.
  • Centropomus undecimalis, family Centropomidae
Example sentences
  • The saltwater river harbors prized snook, trout, largemouth bass, redfish, and even tarpon.
  • I also planned to fish the Indian / Banana river and Mosquito lagoon for redfish, snook, sea trout and ladyfish.
  • Yeah, problem was, there literally wasn't anybody to paddle out with, and I could see all the mullet, and the snook, tarpon and sharks feeding on them out there.

Origin

late 17th century: from Dutch snoek (see snoek).

More
  • cock from (Old English):

    The ancient root of the word cock was probably suggested by the sound the bird makes. The same root is likely to have given us chicken as well. If you are cock-a-hoop you are extremely pleased, especially after some success or triumph. The expression dates from the 17th century and comes from an earlier phrase set cock a hoop. Cock here may be used in the sense of a tap for stopping the flow of liquid, so that the expression refers to turning on the tap of a beer barrel and allowing beer to flow freely before a drinking session. A cock-and-bull story is a ridiculous and implausible tale. The expression ‘talk of a cock and a bull’ is recorded from the early 17th century, and apparently refers to some rambling story or fable, a ‘shaggy dog story’, which is now lost. To cock a snook, first recorded in 1791, is to show open contempt or lack of respect for someone or something, originally by touching your nose with your thumb and spreading out your fingers. Cock here means ‘to stick out stiffly’, but the origin of snook is not known. Because it is such an unfamiliar word, people have often taken to saying snoot (slang for ‘nose’) instead of snook. See also cox

Definition of snook in:

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There are 2 main definitions of snook in English:

Share this entry

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snook2

Line breaks: snook
Pronunciation: /snuːk
 
/

noun

(in phrase cock a snook) informal , chiefly British
1Place one’s hand so that the thumb touches one’s nose and the fingers are spread out, in order to express contempt.
1.1Openly show contempt or a lack of respect for someone or something: he spent a lifetime cocking a snook at the art world
More example sentences
  • Rather than making money, criminals may simply want to display their prowess - cocking a snook at the establishment and earning the respect of their peers in the underworld.
  • It does not mind cocking a snook at conventional codes in the process.
  • Proper in his manner, he was still not beyond cocking a snook at authority.

Origin

late 18th century: of unknown origin.

More
  • cock from (Old English):

    The ancient root of the word cock was probably suggested by the sound the bird makes. The same root is likely to have given us chicken as well. If you are cock-a-hoop you are extremely pleased, especially after some success or triumph. The expression dates from the 17th century and comes from an earlier phrase set cock a hoop. Cock here may be used in the sense of a tap for stopping the flow of liquid, so that the expression refers to turning on the tap of a beer barrel and allowing beer to flow freely before a drinking session. A cock-and-bull story is a ridiculous and implausible tale. The expression ‘talk of a cock and a bull’ is recorded from the early 17th century, and apparently refers to some rambling story or fable, a ‘shaggy dog story’, which is now lost. To cock a snook, first recorded in 1791, is to show open contempt or lack of respect for someone or something, originally by touching your nose with your thumb and spreading out your fingers. Cock here means ‘to stick out stiffly’, but the origin of snook is not known. Because it is such an unfamiliar word, people have often taken to saying snoot (slang for ‘nose’) instead of snook. See also cox

Definition of snook in:

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