Definition of sordid in English:

sordid

Line breaks: sor¦did
Pronunciation: /ˈsɔːdɪd
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

sordidly

adverb
More example sentences
  • He examines Flynn's life frankly, but never sordidly.
  • Hsiao-kang's compulsive attempts to escape the alienating isolation of Taipei become, then, sordidly futile, tinted ironically with the female's colorless lonesomeness in Paris.
  • But there was something sordidly exciting about the offer.

sordidness

noun
More example sentences
  • He lived a secretive, closeted life, tormented by illicit desires and guilt at what he called, in one diary entry, ‘the sordidness of much of my past.’
  • I think what I was commenting on there was the fact that I despise sordidness and low-life, and avoided it at all costs.
  • After calls to 8 or 10 other producers in town, none of whom was willing to get involved with such sordidness, Leslie told them to call me.

Origin

late Middle English (as a medical term in the sense 'purulent'): from French sordide or Latin sordidus, from sordere 'be dirty'. The current senses date from the early 17th century.

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grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively