Definition of south-east in English:

south-east

Line breaks: south-east

noun

1 (usually the south-east) The direction towards the point of the horizon midway between south and east: a ship was coming in from the south-east
More example sentences
  • Turn right here to climb up to the base of the monument, where there are views north-west over Folly Loch and the Eildons beyond, and to the south-east over Teviotdale towards the Cheviots.
  • They basically moved in three directions: two to the south and one to the south-east.
  • Fuar Tholl radiates three spurs, to the north, the south and to the south-east, and it is on these spurs that the great rock features of the mountain are prominent.
1.1The compass point corresponding to south-east.
2The south-eastern part of a country, region, or town: opposition to Turkish influence was strongest in the south-east
More example sentences
  • The villagers died when petrol gushing out of the vandalised pipeline in a rural region in the south-east of the country caught fire.
  • But the growth has yet to reach the south-east, the region which has been hardest hit by the recent droughts.
  • Camberley is another one of those familiar dormitory towns that punctuate the south-east of England.

adjective

[attributive] Back to top  
1Lying towards, near, or facing the south-east: a table stood in the south-east corner
More example sentences
  • Towards the south-east end of the island the gullies open out to a kelp forest, before deepening into a series of steps which drop sharply to 30m.
  • On the inauguration day itself, he demonstrated this commitment to integrity and unity by suddenly arriving in the autonomous province of Ajara, down in the south-east corner of the Black Sea.
  • The quarry firm has claimed that reducing blasts to the level suggested would affect the economic viability of the south-east corner of the quarry, which only has a short lifespan.
1.1(Of a wind) blowing from the south-east.
More example sentences
  • Hot equatorial climate, south-east tradewinds blow May to November, but usually calm in the morning.
  • The site was selected for its northern orientation, its shelter from the prevailing south-east wind, its open terrain, views and landform.
  • The south-east monsoon cuts visibility from June to August, but the main rains come with the north-west monsoon from December to March, when heavy seas can restrict diving.
2Of or denoting the south-eastern part of a specified country, region, or town or its inhabitants: South East Asia
More example sentences
  • On Christmas Day the family, who lived in Old Town until emigrating to south-east Asia in June, anchored off Patong beach on Phuket Island.
  • There are more than 900 species worldwide, most of which occur in mountains in subtropical and tropical regions from India to south-east Asia.
  • It is a country composed of hundreds of tropical islands in south-east Asia, in the region where the Pacific and the Indian Oceans meet.

adverb

Back to top  
To or towards the south-east: turn south-east to return to your starting point
More example sentences
  • Kuma's three-storey villa has been built into a hill and looks south-east over the bay of Atami, south of Tokyo.
  • The winds, which had now swung south-east sent great waves over those who still clung to anything they could get a grip on, such as chains, steel uprights or iron support bars.
  • Stafford itself is on the river Sow, which joins the Trent south-east of the town.

Derivatives

south-eastern

adjective
More example sentences
  • State officials say at least 140,000 homes and businesses across south-eastern Louisiana were so badly damaged that they must be torn down.
  • Alaskans, with what passes for humour, call this relatively temperate south-eastern corner of their state ‘the banana belt’.
  • Most important among the sites is Perperikon, 20 km north-east of the town of Kurdjali in south-eastern Bulgaria.

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Pronunciation: ˈdɪŋkəm
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