Definition of stead in English:

stead

Line breaks: stead
Pronunciation: /stɛd
 
/

noun

  • The place or role that someone or something should have or fill (used in referring to a substitute): you wish to have him superseded and to be appointed in his stead
    More example sentences
    • Managing to gain King Peter's favor, she has acted in his stead during his illness.
    • He quoted the Local Autonomy Act, saying that a mayor has to issue an order appointing a deputy mayor to act in his stead.
    • They had ceased to patronise the nautch, and in its stead preferred English music or military bands.

Phrases

stand someone in good stead

Be advantageous or useful to someone in the future: his early training stood him in good stead
More example sentences
  • Zaharia expects the experience gained in this election will stand her in good stead in the future, which, she suggests, could include another campaign.
  • But the ability to address a large number of people, from ministers in Parliament to troops on the battlefield, stood Elizabeth in good stead for the future.
  • For Guinness, it was ‘a psychological bulwark against the uncertainties of war and fear of the future and it stood me in good stead.’

Origin

Old English stede 'place', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch stad 'town', German Statt 'place', Stadt 'town', from an Indo-European root shared by the verb stand.

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