Definition of stodge in English:

stodge

Line breaks: stodge
Pronunciation: /stɒdʒ
 
/

noun

[mass noun] British informal
  • 1Food that is heavy, filling, and high in carbohydrates: she ate her way through a plateful of stodge
    More example sentences
    • If you're poor in this world, this is how you get your daily energy: a big pile of carbohydrates with a tiny amount of proteins, fats, spice or salt to leaven the stodge.
    • This time, he put together a menu that was all his own: it was very British food, but executed without a hint of stodge.
    • For supper tonight, three-quarters of us will be eating mainly stodge - a pile of carbohydrates.
  • 1.1Dull and uninspired material or work.
    More example sentences
    • Instead there is a formless narrative stodge, a summary report of a life, high on biographical fact and very low on the literary qualities he valued most.
    • Compared with the stodge of American papers, their sheer inertness, what's on offer in England never fails to amaze me.

Origin

late 17th century (as a verb in the sense 'stuff to stretching point'): symbolic, suggested by stuff and podge.

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