There are 2 definitions of stour in English:

stour1

Line breaks: stour
Pronunciation: /stʊə
 
/
(also stoor)

noun

[mass noun] Scottish & Northern English
Dust forming a cloud or deposited in a mass: demolition stour clung thickly to the walls
More example sentences
  • We buy a crumbling house, invite half a dozen builders in to demolish its interior walls - then grumble about the stour, the noise and the unsightly skip in the garden.
  • A strategically-placed napkin saves my cassoulet from the stour as it falls to earth.
  • The architect, thought long and hard about the look of his upturned boats but evidently did not realise that the stoor created by construction work would trigger the fire alarms.

Origin

late Middle English: of uncertain origin.

Derivatives

stoury

adjective
More example sentences
  • It wis that pitch black and stoory inside that ye could see nothin’ even if ye pressed richt up the gless.
  • The water was a bit stoury at first, due to how fine the sand was and fifteen pairs of fins all kicking off from the beach.
  • After the bulldozers methodically razed the area, so that stoory rubble stretched as far as the developers’ eyes could see, two or three little buildings, a tiny raggle of pubs and betting shops, remained erect.

Definition of stour in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day keek
Pronunciation: kiːk
verb
peep surreptitiously

There are 2 definitions of stour in English:

Stour2

Line breaks: Stour
Pronunciation: /ˈstaʊə
 
/
1A river of southern England which rises in west Wiltshire and flows south-east to meet the English Channel east of Bournemouth.
2 /also stʊə/ A river of eastern England which rises south-east of Cambridge and flows south-eastwards to the North Sea.
3A river of central England which rises west of Wolverhampton and flows south-westwards through Stourbridge and Kidderminster to meet the Severn at Stourport-on-Severn.