Definition of sublate in English:

sublate

Line breaks: sub|late
Pronunciation: /səˈbleɪt
 
/

verb

[with object] Philosophy
Assimilate (a smaller entity) into a larger one: fragmented aspects of the self the subject is unable to sublate
More example sentences
  • In Middle Passage slavery can be thought of as an ontic wound, and all moral judgment is sublated because of a general deconstruction of values in the face of the universal condition of man.
  • It affirmed what Stanley calls ‘the ontology of objective nature’ at the expense of a worldview sublating nature to Spirit.
  • The overt sexual content has not been sublated by form or symbolism.

Origin

mid 19th century (earlier ( mid 16th century) as sublation): from Latin sublat- 'taken away', from sub- 'from below' + lat- (from the stem of tollere 'take away').

Derivatives

sublation

noun
More example sentences
  • Bloechl's criticism focuses upon the Hegelian sublation he finds in Gibbs' effort to reconcile the dialectical opposition between philosophy and Judaism.
  • Bourdieu's analysis is the sublation of Flaubert's novel: what it keeps is the book's true hidden nature, and all that it sloughs off is chaff.
  • What is strikingly interesting and appropriate is that Marx's surpassing of Hegel on this matter is a simultaneous retention and is, therefore, a true sublation.

Definition of sublate in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day deictic
Pronunciation: ˈdeɪktɪk
adjective
denoting a word whose meaning depends on context...