Definition of suet in English:

suet

Line breaks: suet
Pronunciation: /ˈs(j)uːɪt
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
The hard white fat on the kidneys and loins of cattle, sheep, and other animals, used to make foods such as puddings, pastry, and mincemeat: [as modifier]: suet dumplings
More example sentences
  • In a large mixing bowl, mix together the flour, suet and coriander, and add enough cold water to form a soft dough.
  • Standard ingredients are flour, breadcrumbs, suet, dried fruit, eggs, treacle, spices, sugar, and milk, with a raising agent and often with some apple or carrot.
  • However, instead of suggesting his film star friends stick to their egg-white omelettes and leave his suet pastry crusts alone, Roddam decided to do something completely different.

Origin

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French, from the synonymous word su, from Latin sebum 'tallow'.

Derivatives

suety

adjective
More example sentences
  • If you lunch in a Pall Mall club, you will find the menu degenerating, as it reaches the sweet course, into nursery food - bread and butter pudding, jam roll and custard, suety lumps covered with treacle - and you can almost hear nanny's voice ordering you to eat it all up.
  • Described on the menu as ‘not seasonal, just substantial’, the pudding's chunked meat was captured in a thick, suety pastry that soaked up the accompanying jug of gravy faster than Tarquin at the bar was sucking up the Bells.
  • ‘I try to make them picture-perfect,’ Ken Stevens said, and they were: row upon row of 12-day-aged top sirloins, Tbones, rib eyes and porterhouses, blood-red and juicy, their suety white edges trimmed just so, with flecks and veins of marbled fat guaranteeing the locked-in flavor that is one of the most famous of American tastes.

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