There are 3 definitions of tack in English:

tack1

Line breaks: tack

noun

1A small, sharp broad-headed nail: tacks held the remaining rags of carpet to the floor
More example sentences
  • In the house, the canisters are good for storing tacks, nails, and small screws.
  • These make great places to store nails, screws, nut, bolts, washers, tacks, and staples.
  • The tack hammers are very small but the actual tacks themselves are very sharp.
Synonyms
1.1North American A drawing pin: here are some tacks—put up a notice
More example sentences
  • Insert map pins, metal tacks, and pushpins with plastic heads to create dots, stripes, and hearts.
  • This wooden tote comes to the rescue by organizing all the necessary implements, including pens, self-adhesive notepads, tacks, and paper dips.
  • ‘You wore labels last year,’ Tiffany said suddenly, looking the tiniest bit disbelieving as she jumped into the conversation, placing her box of tacks down onto her desk.
2A long stitch used to fasten fabrics together temporarily, prior to permanent sewing.
3A method of dealing with a situation or problem; a course of action or policy: as she could not stop him going she tried another tack and insisted on going with him
More example sentences
  • So he changed tack, keeping the innovative production methods but applying them to better-known repertoire, until he felt he had built up an audience that was loyal to the company.
  • In the summer of 1998, when the Bank was still getting used to independence, it changed tack abruptly from raising rates in the summer to cutting them in the autumn.
  • The first tack, known as Plan A, is the latest version of Ottawa's appeasement strategy.
Synonyms
approach, way, method, process; policy, procedure, technique, tactic, plan, strategy, stratagem, programme, line of attack; course of action, line of action, path, line, angle, direction, course
4 Sailing An act of changing course by turning a boat’s head into and through the wind, so as to bring the wind on the opposite side.
More example sentences
  • Royal Caribbean has recognized that it is heading for this iceberg, and its captains have ordered a sharp tack.
  • As I approach my first tack, I pull in the main sail.
  • As the pair battled to the finish, Ian immediately tacked off to gain clear wind, but Jonathan timed his next tack well and came back to cover Ian across the line and win the event by half a boat length.
4.1A boat’s course relative to the direction of the wind: the brig bowled past on the opposite tack
More example sentences
  • There was indeed a ship headed in the direction of Dolphin which was still on her southeasterly tack while Indefatigable was now headed northwest.
  • On the water, a yacht on starboard tack has undisputed right-of-way in any confrontation.
  • They steer onto a port tack and begin to sail.
Synonyms
heading, bearing, direction, course, track, path, line
4.2A distance sailed between tacks: it’s a shame to see a yacht drop her sails and start the diesel just because she has to make a few short tacks
More example sentences
  • Terrified of turning the boat into a land-yacht, I minced around in the middle of the navigation in uselessly short tacks that took us no appreciable distance against the wind.
  • On the long beat back to Henholme, Fiscal Folly crossed the lake to the west shore, while F for Joy set a course down the east, with the rest of the fleet on shorter tacks in the centre of the lake.
  • On the short windward leg to the finish, Pilgrim drew alongside Naiad, but was then forced to put in a short tack while Naiad was able to hold her line and clinch a deserved second place and victory in the Classic fleet.
5 Sailing A rope for securing the corner of certain sails.
5.1The corner to which a rope is fastened.
6 [mass noun] The quality of being sticky: cooking the sugar to caramel gives tack to the texture

verb

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1 [with object and adverbial] Fasten or fix in place with tacks: he used the tool to tack down sheets of fibreboard
More example sentences
  • Rigid foam board insulation is tacked onto the exterior sheathing, fortifying the thermal shield.
  • Just tack them to the back of the frame, or glue on with a hot glue gun.
  • Push the panel into the glued surface and use a level to make certain it is plumb before you tack it into position and glue it down permanently.
Synonyms
2 [with object and adverbial] Fasten (pieces of cloth) together temporarily with long stitches: when the dress was roughly tacked together, she tried it on
More example sentences
  • Fringe two same-sized strips, then stack, tack them together and use as one piece.
  • The seams should be tacked down to avoid chafing.
  • If you think it may get sloppy and peek out you can easily tack it to the shirt body on the front and bottom facing seam lines or into the ribbing seam if ribbing is left at the bottom.
Synonyms
2.1 (tack something on) Add or append something to something already existing: the castles have new wings and other bits tacked on customers tell of surprise ‘nuisance fees’ tacked on to every transaction
More example sentences
  • Instead, the philosophical bits are tacked on in set speeches - much like in student essays, really.
  • The bill suggests that it will be fairer to lift the excise duty on fuel, rather than tacking the increased cost on to the registration fee.
  • The final settlement could balloon to $130 million after interest and lawyers' fees are tacked on.
Synonyms
attach, add, append, join, tag, annex
3 [no object] Sailing Change course by turning a boat’s head into and through the wind: their boat was now downwind and they had to tack Compare with wear2.
[from the practice of shifting ropes (see sense 5 of the noun of noun) to change direction]
More example sentences
  • She was tacking to come around on Indefatigable's starboard side.
  • We sight Northern Caye, our anchorage for the night, on the horizon and tack to starboard.
  • He spotted it, and they quickly tacked over west.
3.1 [with object] Alter the course of (a boat) by tacking: I tacked the ship shortly after midnight
More example sentences
  • Watching his handpicked crew in action, expertly tacking the boat, it's hard to believe Team Adventure will stand a chance against his well-funded campaign.
  • After another half hour, the wind shifts, and the guys on deck need to tack the boat.
  • This is a good arrangement for some sailors, but tacking the Genoa will require going forward to pull the sail through the slot or furling the Genoa and unfurling it on the new tack.
3.2 [with adverbial of direction] Make a series of changes of course while sailing: but what happens when you have to tack up a narrow channel singlehanded?
More example sentences
  • She points to the left side of the bay, where a small sailing boat is tacking past the tumble of fallen cliff.
  • I had a mental picture of the surface with the sun shining, and sailing boats tacking to and fro.
  • There she tacked east to west in the lee of the island, and reported winds gusting to 60 knots from the west-northwest, and large to moderate seas.
Synonyms
change course, change direction, change heading; swerve, zigzag; veer off/away; Nauticalgo about, come about, beat, sail into the wind

Origin

Middle English (in the general sense 'something that fastens one thing to another'): probably related to Old French tache 'clasp, large nail'.

Phrases

on the port (or starboard) tack

Sailing With the wind coming from the port (or starboard) side of the boat: as soon as the yacht is established on the starboard tack, the jib sheet is let fly
More example sentences
  • We push on but our mainsail trim needs that runner on the port tack and we drop away a little from the class leaders.
  • The boat will turn almost 180° and you will find yourself back on the port tack you were on before the beginning of the maneuver.
  • It is also easy to just put yourself on a broad reach on the starboard tack any time you wish to use the spinnaker to go downwind.

Derivatives

tacker

noun
More example sentences
  • Each contains 100 coasters, three 30-inch pennant strings, 36 party beads, and three wall tackers.
  • Use a tacker or staple gun to secure the layer of plastic below the horizontal screw strips on the sides.
  • Instead of using poisonous glue you could nail it on or use a tacker.

Definition of tack in:

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Pronunciation: ˈgʌz(ə)l
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily

There are 3 definitions of tack in English:

tack2

Line breaks: tack

noun

[mass noun]
Equipment used in horse riding, including the saddle and bridle.
More example sentences
  • New materials will also be used for tack and horse equipment.
  • Too many training methods place too much emphasis on what kind of tack or equipment to use with the trainer conveniently selling that equipment.
  • She passed the tree where the horse's tack was propped and grabbed Hawk's bridle, the silverwork glinting in the moonlight.

Origin

late 18th century (originally dialect in the general sense 'apparatus, equipment'): contraction of tackle. The current sense dates from the 1920s.

Definition of tack in:

There are 3 definitions of tack in English:

tack3

Line breaks: tack

noun

[mass noun] informal
Cheap, shoddy, or tasteless material: this pop will never trivialize itself and be described as cheap tack
More example sentences
  • Rather than set out to offer an alternative to novelty acts, it cashes in on cheap tongue-in-cheek tack.
  • Tourist tack is almost absent; instead, there are a number of delicatessens, a good wine bar, an antiquarian bookshop and even a shop specialising in period jewellery.
  • If the makers of the film did one thing right, with what is otherwise wholly sentimental tack, it was to cast these two as the leads.

Origin

1980s: back-formation from tacky2.

Definition of tack in: