There are 2 definitions of take off in English:

take off1

1(Of an aircraft or bird) become airborne.
More example sentences
  • The wheels drop off when the aircraft takes off, and the ground crew retrieves them.
  • British fighter aircraft taking off from West Malling airfield were guided by the terrible orange glow on the horizon.
  • The local press has played up the danger these birds might pose for aircraft landing and taking off.
Synonyms
become airborne, leave the ground, take to the air, take wing; be launched, lift off, blast off
1.1(Of an enterprise) become successful or popular: the newly launched electronic newspaper has really taken off
More example sentences
  • Should it ever take off and become wildly popular, you'd be advised to sign up now to avoid MeFi style agony.
  • The Ferry was a success, and the fledgling company really started to take off.
  • Their pure fruit smoothie recipes took off, and they've grown steadily since.
Synonyms
succeed, do well, become popular, catch on, progress, prosper, flourish, thrive, boom, turn out well, work (out)
2 (also take oneself off) Depart hastily: the officer took off after his men
More example sentences
  • He had retrieved it from a rubbish bin but was having little success in taking off with his prize.
  • Together they made millions, but when the relationship soured Doherty took off with just a small bag.
  • A taxi driver was beaten and robbed by three men who then took off in his car.
Synonyms
run away, run off, flee, abscond, take flight, decamp, disappear, leave, go, depart, make off, bolt, make a run/break for it, take to one's heels, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills
informal split, beat it, clear off, clear out, skedaddle, vamoose, hightail it, light out
withdraw, retire, take one's leave, make one's departure, leave, exit, depart, go away, pull out, quit, make oneself scarce
informal clear off, clear out
See parent entry: take

Definition of take off in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day hypnopompic
Pronunciation: ˌhɪpnə(ʊ)ˈpɒmpɪk
adjective
relating to the state immediately preceding waking up

There are 2 definitions of take off in English:

take-off2

Line breaks: take-off

noun

1An instance of becoming airborne: a perfect take-off [mass noun]: the plane accelerated down the runway for take-off
More example sentences
  • Hauling scientists and supplies to the stations gives aircrews a chance to practice icy take-offs and landings and get a feel for being on the ice.
  • Crosswinds of up to 30 knots can be accommodated on aircraft take-off or landing with or without stores.
  • The take-off is flawless; a steep climb has the aircraft high by strip's end to avoid the possibility of ground-fire.
Synonyms
2 informal An act of mimicking someone or something: the film is a take-off of Star Wars
More example sentences
  • Overall I thought it was a marvelous take off of all the hood movies.
  • Brief glimpses of Bleak House and Great Expectations are followed by a wonderfully witty take-off of A Christmas Carol, with skateboarding ghosts and Tiny Tim on electric guitar.
  • Of all the parodies performed on 'The Carol Burnett Show', probably the best-remembered and funniest was an inspired takeoff of the classic film 'Gone With The Wind'.
Synonyms

Definition of take off in: