There are 2 main definitions of tassie in English:

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tassie 1

Line breaks: tas¦sie

noun

Scottish archaic
A small cup.
Example sentences
  • The demon drink is made almost respectable by giving it a friendly name - the amber nectar, the frothing bumper or the silver tassie, the blushful Hippocrene with beaded bubbles winking at the brim.

Origin

Late 18th century: from tass + -ie.

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There are 2 main definitions of tassie in English:

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Tassie 2 Line breaks: Tas¦sie
(also Tassy) Australian informal

noun

1Tasmania: I moved from Sydney down to Tassie three years ago
More example sentences
  • I was born and raised in Tassie, leaving in 1990, but my parents still live there.
  • Jon Hizzard lives on Flinder's Island, just off the windy northeast tip of Tassie.
  • Potatoes are Tassie's most important vegetable with production nudging half a million tonnes a year, a third of Australia's total.
1.1A person from Tasmania: I’m a Queenslander—not sure if there are any Tassies here
More example sentences
  • Bruce, a Tassie from Hobart, invited me to his home and he was so kind to pick me up at the airport.
  • We have more Dutch in the last 5 generations than English, though considering we're Tassies that's no great surprise.
  • Curiously, despite the frequent cold, Tasmanian shoppers are the most prolific ice cream buyers: around 64 per cent of Tassies buy a tub each month.

adjective

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Tasmanian: the Tassie government barbecued Tassie salmon his Tassy mates
More example sentences
  • 'Starting the football year in Tasmania against Collingwood is a huge highlight for our Tassie fans,' Fox said.
  • Little Rivers Brewing Company opened in February and has quickly gained the support of Tassie beer swillers.
  • It looks like the Greek twins and Tassie besties Thalia and Bianca have some competition.

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation.

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Pronunciation: ɪˈnɒkjʊəs
adjective
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