Definition of terrace in English:

terrace

Line breaks: ter|race
Pronunciation: /ˈtɛrəs
 
/

noun

1A level paved area next to a building; a patio: breakfast is served on the terrace
More example sentences
  • The perforated sheets reappear both outside in the jambs of terraces cut into the building and inside as stylish balustrades.
  • Outdoor space is maximised on the tight site, with a large external courtyard off the ground floor waiting area and an outdoor terrace off community health on the first floor.
  • All blocks benefit from the shading effect of a huge glass roof that rests gently and lightly on the various buildings above a panoramic terrace.
2Each of a series of flat areas made on a slope, used for cultivation.
More example sentences
  • Carve a new series of terraces into the slope for easy planting.
  • On steep topography, the filter area should be a gradient terrace with a slope that will not allow erosion.
  • These terraces consist of a series of stone walls cascading down the side of steep slopes to keep small garden strips from being washed away.
2.1 (usually terraces) British A flight of wide, shallow steps providing standing room for spectators in a stadium, especially a soccer ground.
More example sentences
  • When the trainer shouts, the group runs up the stadium's terraces, sending long shadows flickering over the steps.
  • The 11 senior players had been boycotting training since last week, reporting for work only to watch others train from the terraces of Garden Park stadium.
  • Seventies music was blaring out over the tannoy with the Best of Slade and Blondie while fans packed into the ground standing on the terraces behind the goals at both ends.
2.2 Geology A natural horizontal shelf-like formation, such as a raised beach.
More example sentences
  • Uplifted and incised fluvial terraces are preserved in footwall valleys, including those of the Ladopotamos and Vouraikos rivers.
  • The formation of coral terraces is interpreted as the product of approximately uniform long-term uplift superimposed on eustatic changes in sea level.
  • Nevertheless the climatic regime of the palaeosols was fundamentally frigid and these palaeosols formed on glacial terraces beside large permanent glaciers.
3British A row of houses built in one block in a uniform style: an attractive Regency terrace
More example sentences
  • Jim Loughman, aged 70, is in one of three houses in the terrace still owned by Limerick City Council.
3.1An individual house in a terrace: modern furniture looks out of place in your Victorian terrace
More example sentences
  • The property takes up the bottom two floors of a Grade II-listed Regency terrace and comes with a share of the freehold.
  • The birth of our second child means that our modest Victorian terrace is now bulging at the seams.
  • The house she shared with her parents was quite small, a comfortable looking terrace on a long street.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Make or form (sloping land) into a number of level flat areas resembling a series of steps: the slope had to be terraced
More example sentences
  • The land is terraced and, in effect, so are the houses.
  • That area could be terraced into three or four tiers, which would allow for pleasant views and southern exposure.
  • There are numerous options for terracing a slope.

Origin

early 16th century (denoting an open gallery, later a platform or balcony in a theatre): from Old French, literally 'rubble, platform', based on Latin terra 'earth'.

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