There are 2 definitions of tingle in English:

tingle1

Line breaks: tin¦gle
Pronunciation: /ˈtɪŋg(ə)l
 
/

verb

  • Experience or cause to experience a slight prickling or stinging sensation: [no object]: she was tingling with excitement [with object]: a standing ovation that tingled your spine
    More example sentences
    • Suddenly, Jerry's spine tingled, as a slight breeze washed over him.
    • She felt the corner of her eyes prickle and her nose tingled as tiny tears slipped down her cheek, mingling with the blood.
    • I knew Seth wasn't jealous or anything but my stomach tingled at the slightest possibility that he was.
    Synonyms
    prickle, sting, smart, prick, itch, be itchy, be irritated, have a creeping sensation, have goose pimples, have gooseflesh, have pins and needles; North American have goosebumpstremble, quiver, quaver, shiver, quake, twitch, wiggle, throb, shudder, pulsate, vibrate

noun

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Origin

late Middle English: perhaps a variant of tinkle. The original notion was perhaps 'ring in response to a loud noise', but the term was very early applied to the result of hearing something shocking.

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Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 2 definitions of tingle in English:

tingle2

Line breaks: tin¦gle
Pronunciation: /ˈtɪŋg(ə)l
 
/

noun

  • An S-shaped metal clip used to support heavy panes of glass or slates on a roof.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a small tack): related to Middle High German zingel 'small tack or hook', probably from a Germanic base meaning 'fasten'. The current sense dates from the late 19th century.

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