There are 3 definitions of tot in English:

tot1

Line breaks: tot
Pronunciation: /tɒt
 
/

noun

1A very young child: dancing classes for tiny tots
More example sentences
  • Many schools wore a festive look; sweets were distributed to tiny tots and one school provided free insurance cover for children.
  • Over 200 tiny tots, all orphans, from Helpage Care India and Sharada Mandir flocked to the club, off Mysore Road, to celebrate the event.
  • From tiny tots to teenagers, the camp is the place to be for those willing to spend free time - a valuable commodity these days - productively.
Synonyms
baby, babe, infant, toddler, newborn, tiny tot, child, little one, mite; Scottishbairn, wean
informal sprog, young 'un
North American informal rug rat
technical neonate
2chiefly British A small amount of a strong alcoholic drink such as whisky or brandy: a tot of brandy
More example sentences
  • In Ronald Burton Milner's case, the drop is a tot of whisky before he goes to bed and a glass of Guinness with his Sunday lunch.
  • She likes a tot of whisky and has always been a flirt, especially with the doctors.
  • His coachman's way of keeping warm was to have a tot of whisky while he was waiting for the Archbishop to come out of the theatre.
Synonyms
dram, small measure, drink, nip, slug, drop, draught, swallow, swig
informal shot, finger, snifter
rare libation

Origin

early 18th century (originally dialect): of unknown origin.

Definition of tot in:

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Word of the day inamorata
Pronunciation: ɪˌnaməˈrɑːtə
noun
a person's female lover

There are 3 definitions of tot in English:

tot2

Line breaks: tot
Pronunciation: /tɒt
 
/

verb (tots, totting, totted)

[with object] (tot something up) chiefly British
1Add up numbers or amounts: he picked up the account book and totted up some figures
More example sentences
  • We'd actually put Greece at the head of the pack by the time we'd totted everything up, and correctly predicted that the UK would come last.
  • For the purposes of voting, the ballots of one or two obscure communes - no shortage of these - may be totted up under the aegis of a larger one.
  • The second best player will receive two points and the third best one point, and those points will be totted up during the year.
Synonyms
add, total, sum, count, calculate, compute, reckon, enumerate, tally, work something out, figure something out, take stock of something, quantify
1.1Accumulate something over a period of time: he totted up 180 League appearances
More example sentences
  • Members of the York branch of the Dunkirk Veterans Association totted up an impressive £1,131 for their cause when they mounted a day's cash-collecting offensive in the Coppergate Centre.
  • Last year Matthew earned $506,273 in 27 starts, totted up seven top-ten finishes and, famously, made the putt that regained the Solheim Cup from American clutches.
  • Swindon Services, the arm of the council responsible for street cleaning and other frontline work, totted up savings of £210,000 last year.
Synonyms
accumulate, gather, build up, amass, accrue, stockpile, acquire; mount up

Origin

mid 18th century: from archaic tot 'set of figures to be added up', abbreviation of total or of Latin totum 'the whole'.

Definition of tot in:

There are 3 definitions of tot in English:

tot3

Line breaks: tot
Pronunciation: /tɒt
 
/

verb (tots, totting, totted)

[no object] (usually as noun totting) British informal
Salvage saleable items from dustbins or rubbish heaps: local authorities frown on totting and many ban it outright

Origin

late 19th century: from slang tot 'bone', of unknown origin.

Definition of tot in: