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transfiguration

Line breaks: trans|fig¦ur|ation
Pronunciation: /ˌtransfɪɡəˈreɪʃ(ə)n
 
, ˌtrɑːns-, -ɡjʊr-, -nz-/

Definition of transfiguration in English:

noun

1A complete change of form or appearance into a more beautiful or spiritual state: in this light the junk undergoes a transfiguration; it shines
More example sentences
  • I intend to focus on single colour works, in which changes of shape produce transfigurations of space.
  • After a couple of minutes, the music undergoes a magical transfiguration: it's as though Exeter Cathedral's stained-glass angels had taken wing, soaring up to the heavens.
  • Here follows, etymological notes and a transfiguration (though poor) into modern English.
1.1 (the Transfiguration) Christ’s appearance in radiant glory to three of his disciples (Matthew 17:2 and Mark 9:2-3).
Example sentences
  • In the Transfiguration scene the disciples see Jesus conversing with Elijah, whose return heralds the end.
  • In Mark's account of the Transfiguration Jesus is set alongside the great prophets.
  • Orthodox Christians live - habitually, I would say - within a liturgical environment that transfigures body and soul, the entire world, in this vision of the light of the Transfiguration.
1.2The Church festival commemorating Christ’s transfiguration, held on 6 August.
Example sentences
  • Between August 1 and 6, San Salvador holds a fiesta (major celebration) commemorating the Transfiguration of Christ.
  • On the holiday of the Transfiguration, apples and honey are blessed and eaten along with other fruits of the season.
  • The feast of the Transfiguration, so venerated by the Orthodox Church, serves as a key to the understanding of the humanity of Christ in the Eastern tradition.

Origin

late Middle English (with biblical reference): from Old French, or from Latin transfiguratio(n-), from the verb transfigurare (see transfigure).

Definition of transfiguration in:

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