There are 3 definitions of trap in English:

trap1

Line breaks: trap
Pronunciation: /trap
 
/

noun

1A device or enclosure designed to catch and retain animals, typically by allowing entry but not exit or by catching hold of a part of the body: the squirrels ravaged the saplings, despite the baited traps a bear trap
More example sentences
  • All of us must have seen pictures of animals caught in traps, a horrible slow painful death.
  • She had her hands over her mouth, and her eyes looked like an animal caught in a trap, bleeding its life away.
  • It would also ban the use of snares and traps to catch wild animals.
1.1The compartment from which a greyhound is released at the start of a race.
More example sentences
  • Tyrone came racing out of the traps like well-trained greyhounds hungry for the only prize that mattered.
  • But it's like, he's scarcely out of the traps when the race is over, if you know what I mean.
  • Saturday morning traffic, cars stalled like greyhounds waiting for the traps to open.
2A situation in which people lie in wait to make a surprise attack: police deliberately herded 400 demonstrators into a trap and then attacked and arrested them
More example sentences
  • Much influenced by the battle of Cannae, he dwelt on the need for the left wing to fall back before the French, drawing them deeper into the trap.
  • Over a career involving many dozens of battles, sieges, and skirmishes, Cromwell was beaten once: at Clonmel in May 1650, when he walked into a trap laid by Hugh O'Neill.
  • As we said, the American soldier is qualified to perform cinematic roles only and the enemy will lose his heaviest casualties in these traps.
2.1A trick by which someone is misled into acting contrary to their interests or intentions: by keeping quiet I was walking into a trap
More example sentences
  • I suspect Bush may be walking into a trap in considering retaliation.
  • This is a trap, a trick, something sneaky to test me.
  • I felt he was so used to being dismissed that he found my compliments false, a trick, a trap, a delusion.
Synonyms
2.2An unpleasant situation from which it is hard to escape: they fell into the trap of relying too little on equity finance
More example sentences
  • The call for women to start families earlier fell into the trap of ignoring the social and economic realities forcing many women to put off childbirth, they said.
  • But he too fell into the trap of name-calling and distortion when he derided ‘populism of the left that rejects globalisation’.
  • By far one of the most thought provoking reads I've had in a long time. I fell into the trap of buying the movie not 10 minutes after putting it down.
Synonyms
ambush, lure, decoy, bait
dated ambuscade
snare, net; cage, prison; encumbrance, burden, problem
3 [with modifier] A container or device used to collect something, or a place where something collects: one fuel filter and water trap are sufficient on the fuel system
More example sentences
  • Stacking this way also avoids creating a water trap, or gutter, between the bales, which can lead to water entering the bales between the film layers over an extended time.
  • Pitchers are pitfall traps containing enzymes that digest insects and small animals.
  • They contend this might protect them from flood waters from the Burren, but would act as a water trap for flood waters coming off the Mourne Mountains.
3.1A curve in the waste pipe from a bath, basin, or toilet that is always full of liquid and prevents gases from coming up the pipe into the building.
More example sentences
  • Close the water valves and disconnect the water lines just above the valves and the drain piping at the trap.
  • If some such object is presently lodged in your toilet trap, it may be necessary to detach the bowl from the floor.
  • For the first time, I've experienced a most unwelcome intrusion into the most sacred of personal spaces - the toilet trap.
3.2A bunker or other hollow on a golf course.
More example sentences
  • It can maintain the shape of sand traps and bunkers as well as quickly create flower beds and tree rings in other parts of the landscape.
  • How many of you playing out of a sand trap at a local golf course have considered which beach the sand originated from?
  • He kept Europe ahead at the ninth with a sensational bunker shot from an awkward lie in a greenside trap, followed by a successful putt.
4A light, two-wheeled carriage pulled by a horse or pony.
More example sentences
  • From his window he could see the Pyramids, but all he wanted to see was a photograph of Tommy, the pony which pulled the trap for the two of them on their last ride together.
  • All these animals were pets apart from the two work horses which pulled the trap to town to take my father to work in the family business.
  • Got a bottle of milk & a man, horse & trap to pull us through the Waitaho river which is about a mile from the house.
5A device for hurling an object such as a clay pigeon into the air to be shot at.
More example sentences
  • We had to load the clay pigeons into the traps.
  • Now Bill wasn't too good on his feet but he was a very keen clay pigeon shooter and kept his old hammer gun hidden in his cabin along with a clay pigeon trap which he handed to his friend.
  • I noticed the first little clump of snowdrops, by an old beech tree, as I was setting up my clay pigeon trap on the top of a steep bank.
5.1 historical (In the game of trapball) the shoe-shaped device that is hit with a bat to send the ball into the air.
6 short for trapdoor.
7 informal A person’s mouth (used in expressions to do with speaking): keep your trap shut!
More example sentences
  • I kept my trap shut while he was foul mouthing my bosses and I just laughed along.
  • They landed in her cleavage, and when she looked up at me to complain, she must have seen the look of a cold-blooded murderer in my eyes because she shut her trap real quick.
  • This doctor should mind her own business, shut her trap and get a life.
Synonyms
mouth, jaws, lips, maw
informal chops, kisser, yap
British informal gob, cakehole, mush
North American informal puss, bazoo
8 (traps) informal (Among jazz musicians) drums or percussion instruments: I played the traps a little myself once
More example sentences
  • And, placed with care, the balance between cymbals and traps was perfect.
  • Before you've even taken it all in, the traps and hi-hats have locked right in, as well as a deeper, grittier guitar snarl.
  • The drum room boasts a percussion-friendly low-mid frequency boost that's tunable with movable traps.

verb (traps, trapping, trapped)

[with object] Back to top  
1Catch (an animal) in a trap.
More example sentences
  • Once he dreamed he was trying to trap foxes but kept catching Dalmatians.
  • The second panel describes how coastal tribes came on seasonal trips for food, trapping birds and catching eels.
  • Russell, a fifth generation sheep farmer, has trapped wild dogs most of his life and has come out of retirement to help control the explosion in the wild dog population.
Synonyms
confine, catch, cut off, corner, pin down, drive into a corner, pen, hem in, close in, shut in, hedge in, imprison, hold captive
1.1Prevent (someone) from escaping from a place: twenty workers were trapped by flames
More example sentences
  • Pictorially, for Louis de Roncherolles there is no escape; he is trapped for perpetuity within a closed circle of mourning and death.
  • The hopelessness and lack of escape traps the young girl in a never-ending cycle of exploitation.
  • The checkpoint opens and closes randomly, trapping students and workers on the wrong side after a day at work or school, preventing them from returning home.
1.2Have (something, typically a part of the body) held tightly by something so that it cannot be freed: he had trapped his finger in a spring-loaded hinge
More example sentences
  • His body is trapped permanently in a glacier beneath the mountain that took him.
  • Her whole body is totally trapped - if she moves at all, her bones break.
  • She also realised most of her body was trapped, and this made Victoria scared.
Synonyms
get stuck, catch, get caught
1.3 Soccer Bring (the ball) under control with the foot or other part of the body on receiving it: the ball bounced near Scott and he trapped it with his left foot
More example sentences
  • Because there is no doubt about his ability, as evidenced by the superb piece of skill he showed when trapping a through ball in the first half before jinking his way past three players to work an opening.
  • Forlan traps the ball on the left-hand side of the box and volleys it first time through a crowded area and to the left of a diving Sylva.
  • After 13 minutes a long punt up field by Worns found Kevin Kuranyi who trapped the ball with his chest, turned but fired wide from the edge of the box.
2Trick or deceive (someone) into doing something contrary to their interests or intentions: I hoped to trap him into an admission
More example sentences
  • The trick is trapping someone into thinking it the problem has to be dealt with in polar opposites.
  • They liked seeing if they could trick and trap her.
  • She was trapped by her sister, Carol, who tricked her into confessing her secret and used a hidden tape recorder to record her words.
Synonyms
trick, dupe, deceive, cheat, lure, inveigle, beguile, fool, hoodwink, seduce, cajole, wheedle, gull; catch out, trip up, outwit, outsmart
archaic cozen

Origin

Old English træppe (in coltetræppe 'Christ's thorn'); related to Middle Dutch trappe and medieval Latin trappa, of uncertain origin. The verb dates from late Middle English.

Derivatives

trap-like

adjective
More example sentences
  • Like the designs on Iatmul lime containers or the interweaving patterns of Celtic knot work, kinship diagrams and uli, as both physical images and analytical concepts, exert a difficult trap-like influence.
  • It opened its mouth hungrily, showing its trap-like jaw once again while it salivated onto the floor.
  • As fish swim by, the angelshark bursts up and surprises the prey, catching it in its trap-like jaws.

Definition of trap in:

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Word of the day nous
Pronunciation: naʊs
noun
common sense; practical intelligence

There are 3 definitions of trap in English:

trap2

Line breaks: trap
Pronunciation: /trap
 
/

verb (traps, trapping, trapped)

[with object] (usually as adjective trapped) archaic
Put trappings on (a horse): gaily trapped mules

Origin

late Middle English: from the obsolete noun trap 'trappings', from Old French drap 'drape'.

Definition of trap in:

There are 3 definitions of trap in English:

trap3

Line breaks: trap
Pronunciation: /trap
 
/
(also traprock)

noun

[mass noun] North American
Basalt or a similar dark, fine-grained igneous rock.
More example sentences
  • This mineral may have been derived from the mafic traprock.

Origin

late 18th century: from Swedish trapp, from trappa 'stair' (because of the often stair-like appearance of its outcroppings).

Definition of trap in: