Definition of trochaic in English:

trochaic

Line breaks: tro|cha¦ic
Pronunciation: /trə(ʊ)ˈkeɪɪk
 
/
Prosody

adjective

Consisting of or featuring trochees.
More example sentences
  • Calendars begins with the cadenced trochaic tetrameter rhythms of ‘Landing Under Water, I See Roots’.
  • The only notable exceptions are the trochaic tetrameters of ‘The Phoenix and Turtle’ and the iambic tetrameters of Sonnet 145.
  • The auditory ease of the merry mockeries of maidens is abruptly undermined by the trochaic retarding of the ‘sharp voices’ insisting on ‘maiden labour.’

noun

(usually trochaics) Back to top  
A type of verse that consists of or features trochees.
More example sentences
  • His infantile trochaics addressed to children (‘Dimply damsel, sweetly smiling’, etc.) earned him the nickname of ‘Namby Pamby’, though Johnson described them as his pleasantest pieces.
  • Trochaics have rarely been more amusingly used than in Lewis Carroll's 'Hiawatha's Photographing', in which Hiawatha is exasperatedly trying to take portraits of a very tiresome and camera-conscious Victorian family.
  • The new metre is most likely to result from poems written in what are called trochaics, or two-syllabled feet stressed on the first syllable.

Origin

late 16th century: via Latin from Greek trokhaikos, from trokhaios (see trochee).

Definition of trochaic in:

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Pronunciation: əbˈdʒʊə
verb
solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim)