Definition of troop in English:

troop

Line breaks: troop
Pronunciation: /truːp
 
/

noun

  • 2A cavalry unit commanded by a captain.
    More example sentences
    • From the 16th century the troop, a captain's command, was the basic subunit in the cavalry.
    • The unit conducting this mission was a standard regimental armored cavalry troop of the early 1990s era.
    • The cavalry troop headquarters would include requisite maintenance, command and control, and liaison capabilities.
  • 2.1A unit of artillery and armoured formation.
    More example sentences
    • There, the infantry and the armour troops had been doing the same task.
    • Despite being a novice at commanding armoured units, he quickly grasped the great potential of mechanised and armoured troops.
    • The video started with an advancing troop of soldiers who fanned out across an open plain that offered only the protection of the few trees and old stone properties.
  • 2.2A group of three or more Scout patrols.
    More example sentences
    • And then he was gone, following the Scout troop.
    • A scout troop with a proud history has been told to raise £100,000 or face extinction.
    • Matt has been a member of the scout troop for five years.

verb

[no object, with adverbial of direction] Back to top  
  • 1(Of a group of people) come or go together or in large numbers: the girls trooped in for dinner
    More example sentences
    • A group of kids trooped in and stood near the door.
    • As the group was trooping together up the staircase to their rooms, Josh looked over at Katie.
    • The three of us trooped off together to get outfitted at a mid-town haberdashery.
    Synonyms
    walk, march, file, straggle; flock, crowd, throng, stream, swarm, surge, spill
  • 1.1(Of a lone person) walk at a slow or steady pace: Caroline trooped wearily home from work
    More example sentences
    • By the time he was trooping back for the second half, news had filtered through that Middlesbrough were 2-0 up at Leicester.
    • Neighbours saw a 44 year old bloke trooping about with a guitar; police were called and now the bloke is in a local hospital under the mental health act.
    • Anyway, having spent the day at home doing various little jobs and waiting for some furniture to be delivered, I duly trooped down to London late afternoon and got to The Chandos before anyone else.
    Synonyms
    trudge, plod, traipse, trail, drag oneself, tramp
    North American informal schlep

Phrases

troop the colour

British Perform the ceremony of parading a regiment’s flag along ranks of soldiers.
More example sentences
  • The honour can be registered in the history of the regiment and displayed if the regiment is trooping the colour but does not have any other physical manifestation.
  • There she is, trooping the color and the Guards ceremony and so forth.
  • It is one of only three public occasions on which the Lord Mayor troops the colour with the horse-drawn carriage, thus ranking the Dublin Horse Show up there with Bloomsday and St Patrick's Day.

Origin

mid 16th century: from French troupe, back-formation from troupeau, diminutive of medieval Latin troppus 'flock', probably of Germanic origin.

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