There are 2 definitions of Trot in English:

Trot

Line breaks: Trot
Pronunciation: /trɒt
 
/

noun

informal , chiefly • derogatory
  • A Trotskyist or supporter of extreme left-wing views: a band of subversive Trots he declared that the Corporation was a ‘nest of long-haired Trots’
    More example sentences
    • It admits that a third of its executive committee are Trots, and there does seem to be a hardline Bolshevik edge to the organisation's campaigning.
    • In Marxist terms, the Trots have preferred feudal theocracy to bourgeois democracy which - in non-Marxist terms - is disgraceful and stupid, as a few members of the far Left are starting to realise.
    • The days of Trots taking over constituency Labour parties did Labour no good.

Origin

1960s: abbreviation.

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Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkɒlərəˈtjʊərə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody

There are 2 definitions of Trot in English:

trot

Line breaks: trot
Pronunciation: /trɒt
 
/

verb (trots, trotting, trotted)

  • 1(With reference to a horse or other quadruped) proceed or cause to proceed at a pace faster than a walk, lifting each diagonal pair of legs alternately: [no object]: the horses trotted slowly through the night [with object]: he trotted his horse forward
    More example sentences
    • I thought about paying to ride one of the horses, and slowly trotting down the road, until I was out of the sight of the zoo's curator, and then galloping away.
    • By changing the relationship of these lines of influence, we can ask the horse to walk, trot, stop, back or turn and to do those things in a particular direction at a particular speed.
    • We moved off, and I walked, trotted, and cantered on a horse I had only dreamed about owning.
  • 2 [no object, with adverbial of direction] (Of a person) run at a moderate pace with short steps: the child trotted across to her obediently
    More example sentences
    • The tall, thin volleyball player trotted quickly up the steps toward another endless hallway of oblivious dark.
    • Steven trotted up the steps to his home, clutching a bouquet of wild flowers in his hand.
    • Students trot on and off campus completely oblivious to the huge potential for campus life that lies just beneath their noses.
    Synonyms
  • 2.1 informal Go or walk briskly: I may trot round to Portobello market for vegetables
    More example sentences
    • Lady hesitated for a moment, watching the two in front of her with an inquisitive look before trotting off briskly to catch up.
    • She trotted briskly into the ring and saluted the judge and then she started.
    • Her face became even more troubled, and she trotted off briskly towards their monument.

noun

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  • 1A trotting pace: our horses slowed to a trot
    More example sentences
    • As Charcoal neared the edge of the woods, Mark leaned forward in the saddle, making her change her pace from a trot to a full-fledged gallop.
    • Kat walked Jazz for several minutes before increasing his pace to a trot.
    • Grant looked back behind their Jeep and saw Arian keeping pace at a mere trot.
  • 1.1An act or period of trotting: you might like an early morning trot round the crew deck
    More example sentences
    • The day starts with the early morning trots and gallops.
    • We've now been assured by the owner that the horse is safe and secure and won't be making any more midnight trots out alone.
    • Although Danielle tries not to play favorites, Twig definitely is her first choice for a nice early morning trot or a late summer's evening ride.
  • 1.2 (the trots) Australian /NZ informal Trotting races: she was taking me to the trots
    More example sentences
    • They would rail about people who went to the trots or to the races and spent their pay packets on the horses.
    • And as soon as the last race finishes, Sky switches to the trots and dogs.
    • If ever there was an industry in desperate need of rationalisation, it's the racing industry, from horses, to dogs and the trots.
  • 2 (the trots) • informal Diarrhoea.
    More example sentences
    • 'While living in Papua New Guinea as a child, my father and I got a bad case of the trots.’
    • Rehydration salts - Ah, the trots, I know a lot of people who never leave home without them, so a couple of these sachets tucked away won't come in wrong.
    • Where I come from, ‘trots’ has always been slang for diarrhea, i.e. ‘I had a terrible case of the trots this morning after all those pints last night.’
  • 3 [with adjective] Australian /NZ informal A period of luck of a specified kind: Simpson believes his bad trot is about to end
    More example sentences
    • Well it was a quote from Theodore Roosevelt, which I put into my wallet very early on in my career after a particularly bad trot.
    • The only thing that motivates this Minister is when he gets three bad trots on the TV show night after night.
    • I think it helped that I played first-class cricket, it helps you to know what the players are thinking and going through if they are having a bad trot.

Phrases

on the trot

informal
  • 2Continually busy: I’ve been on the trot all day
    More example sentences
    • We again went on the trot all day trying to see everything.
    • He saw the tension on my face but he had no idea that I had been on the trot all morning.

Phrasal verbs

trot something out

informal Provide an explanation or piece of information that has already been used many times before: everyone trots out the old excuse
More example sentences
  • The old favourites are trotted out: better inter-agency working; more sharing of information; improved record-keeping; more sophisticated risk assessment.
  • And even now, just occasionally, someone from the Old School will still trot them out.
  • Twenty-one years on and the same old collection of ideas are trotted out from the business lobby.
Synonyms
recite, repeat, reiterate, restate, regurgitate, churn out; come out with, produce

Origin

Middle English: from Old French trot (noun), troter (verb), from medieval Latin trottare, of Germanic origin.

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