Definition of twirl in English:

twirl

Line breaks: twirl
Pronunciation: /twəːl
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Spin quickly and lightly round, especially repeatedly: she twirled in delight to show off her new dress
More example sentences
  • Obviously a boy who appreciates a big stage when he sees one, Jack danced and twirled and spun with abandon, much to the delight of the photographers.
  • From time to time, Russian dancers clad in national costume would pop up to dance between the tables, somehow reminiscent of a doll twirling round and round inside a music box.
  • She looked absolutely radiant with joy in her period dress, spinning and twirling on the floor.
Synonyms
1.1 [with object] Cause to rotate: she twirled her fork in the pasta
More example sentences
  • ‘I am,’ said Jacqueline, twirling her fork in her fingers, but not actually touching the food.
  • She gave me a smile as I picked up my fork and started twirling it.
  • Corrina picked up her fork and twirled it around in her salad, never once raising the food to her mouth.
Synonyms
wind, twist, coil, curl, wrap

noun

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1An act of spinning: Kate did a twirl in front of the mirror
More example sentences
  • The more you practice, the more complicated moves you'll be able to do, like turns and twirls.
  • I kept on skating ahead of him, gathering more and more momentum and doing a complex combination of twirls, spins, and turns.
  • We exited the atmosphere perfectly with a few bumps and twirls.
Synonyms
pirouette, spin, whirl, turn;
twist, rotation, revolution, gyration;
Scottish birl
1.1A spiralling or swirling shape, especially a flourish made with a pen: on the lid was a name written in old-fashioned twirls
More example sentences
  • Her name in an exquisite, flowing script glistened back at her, the letters furling and flourishing themselves in elegant swirls and twirls.
  • A telltale sign of both species are the intricate spirals and twirls of their spawn on the base of individual blades of eel-grass, and these will often lead you to the perpetrator.
  • His waxed moustache had turned into perfect twirls at their ends.

Origin

late 16th century: probably an alteration (by association with whirl) of tirl, a variant of archaic trill 'twiddle, spin'.

Derivatives

twirler

noun
More example sentences
  • He estimated a crowd of more than 1000 people who were stunned at the drummers, fire twirlers, fashion parades, dancers, puppet shows, a DJ, street performers and buskers.
  • Spirits were high, the alcohol was free or subsidized, there were fire twirlers, drummers and men on stilts moving around the Victorian Arts Centre forecourt and I was feeling on top of the world.
  • Talent night at the local elementary school tends to conjure up images of kazoo players, off-key warblers and budding baton twirlers, all with big dreams and stars in their eyes.

twirly

adjective (twirlier, twirliest)
More example sentences
  • But I suppose it was too much to expect for him to have a black, twirly moustache and for her to cackle mysteriously from beneath an impenetrable black shroud.
  • It's a drinking song, It's a polka, it's girls in big twirly dresses and they're giving it everything they've got.
  • In 2000 they installed a couple of tall twirly staircases and a giant spider, sculpted out of steel by Louise Bourgeois.

Definition of twirl in:

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