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twofold

Line breaks: two|fold
Pronunciation: /ˈtuːfəʊld
 
/

Definition of twofold in English:

adjective

1Twice as great or as numerous: a twofold increase in the risk
More example sentences
  • The Alliance for Better Campaigns, which supports free ad time for candidates, blamed the broadcast industry for the twofold increase.
  • The deaths in Cianjur, according to him, represent a twofold increase from previous years and so the health ministry has declared it an extraordinary incidence.
  • In tact, a family history of alcoholism is one of the strongest predictors of alcoholism in women, with those having a first-degree relative with alcoholism at a twofold to fourfold increased risk of alcoholism.
1.1Having two parts or elements: the twofold demands of the business and motherhood
More example sentences
  • Flint said the impact might be twofold, lower demand from the US brought about by the weaker dollar may result in a slow down in imports from sub-Saharan Africa.
  • The aim is twofold and according to senior commanders it can be realised: the toppling of the leader and the steady elimination of the terrorists.
  • The advantages of this direct approach are twofold and quintessentially Melbourne.

adverb

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So as to double; to twice the number or amount: use increased more than twofold from 1979 to 1989
More example sentences
  • In this respect, we have increased the minimum salary by 29 per cent, we have also increased the family allowance twofold, and taxes have been significantly reduced.
  • Visits to Amnesty's US website reportedly increased sixfold, donations threefold and the rate of new memberships twofold.
  • According to the Journal of Periodontology, high levels of stress and poor coping skills increase twofold the likelihood of development of periodontal disease.

Words that rhyme with twofold

hundredfold

Definition of twofold in:

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