Definition of ubiquitous in English:

ubiquitous

Line breaks: ubi¦qui|tous
Pronunciation: /juːˈbɪkwɪtəs
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

ubiquitously

adverb
More example sentences
  • Department stores and commercial chains hardly hold the Netherlands in thrall; you don't find many Netherlanders clamouring to spend their Saturday mornings trolley-piloting the ubiquitously cheap and vast Hema emporiums.
  • Colonel Sanders is ubiquitously American, but today's New Zealander, when asked what ‘KFC’ stands for, will intone ‘Kiwi For Chicken’.
  • The new agenda of obligatory social aims, reset by some self-declared avant-garde and not by societies themselves, is similar to the socialist one in the never-changing sense that it is to guarantee ubiquitously correct life.

ubiquitousness

noun
More example sentences
  • The typefaces which Mr Hong mentions, Zuzana Licko's Filosofia and Mrs Eaves, carry with them only a few years of history, but their ubiquitousness has perhaps resulted in their being branded as ‘trendy’.
  • Rather than ascribing desired ubiquitousness to relief from illness, they ascribe it to a process of ‘stimulus generalization.’
  • The first is that like so many conservatives, he is able to deflect criticism as alleged liberal media bias - an accusation that is belied by his very ubiquitousness in that media.

ubiquity

noun
More example sentences
  • I heard more gnatcatchers, but I never did see one, which was a bit surprising given their general ubiquity.
  • What's more, Nike's general ubiquity as a global brand has made it a target for anti-corporate sentiment.
  • Web-based applications are very popular due to the ubiquity of the Internet.

Origin

mid 19th century: from modern Latin ubiquitas (from Latin ubique 'everywhere', from ubi 'where') + -ous.

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