Definition of ultramontane in English:

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ultramontane

Pronunciation: /ˌʌltrəˈmɒnteɪn/

adjective

1Advocating supreme papal authority in matters of faith and discipline: ultramontane Catholicism Compare with Gallican.
More example sentences
  • Any priest who thinks he can dictate the political choices of his parishioners is living an ultramontane fantasy.
  • The new immigrants and these ultramontane clerics who came to serve them overwhelmed the small, relatively Americanized Catholic Church they found here.
  • Weigel's ultramontane effusions about John Paul II are warmly endorsed.
2Situated on the other side of the Alps from the point of view of the speaker: ultramontane basins where almost no rain fell
More example sentences
  • The sun fell blinding white on the snowfields, and the dancing breeze swept ice crystals down from ultramontane glaciers.
  • These opinions were in opposition to the ideas which were called ultramontane.
  • Shatili is the best protected from ultramontane Khevsrian monuments.

noun

A person advocating supreme papal authority.
Example sentences
  • A second and related set of tensions divided Gallicans, who insisted on the independence of the national Church, and ultramontanes, who were more respectful of papal authority.
  • You know what the categories are - ultramontane, gallican, liberal, integriste, laicite, anticlerical, etc. - they were virtually invented here, and they never change.
  • The so-called ultramontanes believed that the state should serve as the secular arm of the Church and enforce its monopoly of the truth against all rival ideologies.

Derivatives

ultramontanism

Pronunciation: /ˌʌltrəˈmɒntənɪz(ə)m/
noun
Example sentences
  • But Milner's Catholicism was no mere ivory-tower ultramontanism.
  • The support for Mary, a universal saint, may sometimes have been at the expense of local cults, making Marian devotions a central element in the progress of ultramontanism.
  • To do this, he needed to single out the Catholics as being guilty of separatism and ultramontanism.

Origin

Late 16th century (denoting a representative of the Roman Catholic Church north of the Alps): from medieval Latin ultramontanus, from Latin ultra 'beyond' + mons, mont- 'mountain'.

For editors and proofreaders

Line breaks: ultra|mon¦tane

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