Definition of unrepeatable in English:

unrepeatable

Line breaks: un|re¦peat|able
Pronunciation: /ʌnrɪˈpiːtəb(ə)l
 
/

adjective

1Not able to be done or made again: an extraordinary and unrepeatable event
More example sentences
  • Advanced Warfighting Experiments are limited in their ability to predict real-world outcomes, since experimental data generally comes from single or few unrepeatable events.
  • However, origins science deals with the origin of things in the past - unique, unrepeatable, unobservable events.
  • But more importantly it also redefines what is happening as something beyond the confines of a ‘miracle’ - a singular and unrepeatable event.
2Too offensive or shocking to be said again: he muttered something unrepeatable under his breath
More example sentences
  • He glared at Robyn's back and muttered something unrepeatable under his breath.
  • Dr Robinson said: ‘Sir David told us a lot of hilarious stories about how the programme was produced, many of which are unrepeatable.’
  • Not surprisingly Equitable is the butt of a number of witticisms doing the rounds of financial circles, most of them unrepeatable in a family newspaper.

Derivatives

unrepeatability

Pronunciation: /-ˈbɪlɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • Souvenirs are the traces that replace the event with narrative, and the desire for them arises from the impression of unrepeatability of the event, or longing for the vanished original.
  • All of the many variables in the process can affect the outcome and this is why it always had a reputation for unpredictability and unrepeatability.
  • At the macroscopic level of everyday life, by contrast, disorder, randomness, and unrepeatability appear.

Definition of unrepeatable in:

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