Definition of unwieldy in English:

unwieldy

Line breaks: un|wieldy
Pronunciation: /ʌnˈwiːldi
 
/

adjective (unwieldier, unwieldiest)

  • 1(Of an object) difficult to move because of its size, shape, or weight: huge, unwieldy arc lamps
    More example sentences
    • So the books that you read shouldn't be too unwieldy in weight, nor contain particularly tight typesetting or small font size.
    • The mask's unwieldy construction made it difficult to fall asleep.
    • But their size makes them unwieldy in city streets, and their acceleration is not tremendous.
    Synonyms
    cumbersome, unmanageable, unhandy, unmanoeuvrable; awkward, difficult, clumsy, ungainly; massive, heavy, hefty, bulky, weighty, ponderous
    informal hulking, clunky
  • 1.1(Of a system) too large or disorganized to function efficiently: the benefits system is unwieldy and unnecessarily complex
    More example sentences
    • Fiba is an unwieldy bureaucracy that is not much concerned with policing its teams.
    • Critics say the plan would create an unwieldy bureaucracy with a hidden agenda.
    • The project of fixing our political system is an unwieldy one for those of us with a theoretical bent.

Derivatives

unwieldily

adverb
More example sentences
  • One of the reasons things have gotten unwieldily is that the replace function is not being used.
  • This is the approach that he takes in assembling the somewhat unwieldily titled Intoxication: Heathcliff on Powell Street.
  • However, it's still only on big rear projection sets which are rather unwieldily huge and expensive.

unwieldiness

noun
More example sentences
  • That fear became an even greater factor when, due to African resistance and rebellion and the unwieldiness of slave-run plantation industrialisation, the slave trade was abolished in 1807.
  • And last week the idea of positioning it using an RAF Chinook was abandoned when bad weather and the sheer unwieldiness of the cargo defeated the airlift.
  • Despite the word's unwieldiness, then, I would propose that mimesis and anti-mimesis confront each other-optically, materially, figuratively-in Triptyque through a logic of ‘photo-scotomization.’

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'lacking strength, infirm'): from un-1 'not' + wieldy (in the obsolete sense 'active').

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elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody