Definition of uptake in English:

uptake

Line breaks: up¦take
Pronunciation: /ˈʌpteɪk
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1The action of taking up or making use of something that is available: the uptake of free school meals
More example sentences
  • The Public Health Minister said the vaccine remained the best form of protection against measles, mumps and rubella and most recent information suggested uptake was on the increase.
  • He welcomed the recent improved uptake in the MMR vaccine, which currently stands at around 77% of the target population.
  • In recent years uptake of the vaccination has decreased following claims it is linked to autism.
1.1The taking in or absorption of a substance by a living organism or bodily organ: the uptake of glucose into the muscles
More example sentences
  • Precisely how insulin-initiated signals are modulated in liver cells for glucose uptake and metabolism is unknown.
  • Ten treated patients had a test that measured average glucose uptake, indicating the metabolism rate of cells.
  • Today, supplement manufacturers are supplying it to you for easier absorption and uptake by your muscles.

Phrases

be quick (or slow) on the uptake

informal Be quick (or slow) to understand something: he shows irritation with people who are slow on the uptake
More example sentences
  • Cricket has been slow on the uptake to see what mental practice can do.
  • It is beyond ridiculous to wait four hours in line to process a simple application, merely because the counter clerk is not quick on the uptake, and is unable to process work at a reasonable speed.
  • They'll be quick on the uptake, so they'll understand your product or service more rapidly than most.

Definition of uptake in:

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