Definition of vacate in English:

vacate

Line breaks: vac¦ate
Pronunciation: /veɪˈkeɪt
 
, vəˈkeɪt
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Leave (a place that one previously occupied): rooms must be vacated by noon on the last day of your holiday
More example sentences
  • The churches recently vacated the land to make way for the proposed developments.
  • In previous years they'd vacated the area by the middle of July.
  • I'd like to press on right now, as we have to vacate the room at noon tomorrow.
Synonyms
leave, get out of, move out of, evacuate, quit, go away from, depart from, exit from, withdraw from, pull out of; abandon, desert, relinquish
archaic forsake
1.1Give up (a position or employment): he vacated his office as Director
More example sentences
  • The move followed several months of rumours and speculations on who was going to fill the position vacated by the former executive director.
  • The 47-year-old vacated the same position at Aberdeen last weekend after almost three years in the job.
  • All these things force her to vacate her position until she has been vindicated.
Synonyms
resign from, leave, stand down from, give up, bow out of, relinquish, depart from, walk out on, retire from, abdicate
informal quit, chuck, pack in
2 Law Cancel or annul (a judgement, contract, or charge): the Justices vacated a ruling by the federal appeals court
More example sentences
  • I confirm that upon payment of the required amount the Board will vacate its charge.
  • If this is acceptable, we will of course vacate the hearing on 5th July.
  • In view of the errors in law so found, the appeal will be allowed and the conviction and sentence will be vacated.

Origin

mid 17th century (as a legal term, also in the sense 'make ineffective'): from Latin vacat- 'left empty', from the verb vacare.

Definition of vacate in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day epyllion
Pronunciation: ɪˈpɪlɪən
noun
a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...