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valency

Line breaks: va|lency
Pronunciation: /ˈveɪl(ə)nsi
 
/

Definition of valency in English:

noun (plural valencies)

Chemistry , chiefly British
1The combining power of an element, especially as measured by the number of hydrogen atoms it can displace or combine with: carbon always has a valency of 4 Compare with valence1.
More example sentences
  • The degree of flocculation, and hence randomness of particle orientations on sedimentation, generally increases with the concentration and valency of the cations in the solution.
  • It is well-known that aggregation can be induced by changes in pH, the salt concentration, valency of ions, or the polarity of the solvent.
  • Depending on the charges of additional groups that may be bound to the phosphate group, phospholipids in water can have a valency between - 2 and + 1, and also neutral groups are possible.
1.1 Linguistics The number of grammatical elements with which a particular word, especially a verb, combines in a sentence: ‘give’ has a valency of three in ‘I (1) gave it (2) to him (3)’
More example sentences
  • The purpose of this paper is to study the factors involved in the changing valency of the reflexes of ABHORRERE / ABHORRESCERE in Castilian, ie aborrir ~ aburrir and aborre cer.

Origin

early 17th century: from late Latin valentia 'power, competence', from valere 'be well or strong'.

Words that rhyme with valency

repellencyWallasey

Definition of valency in:

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