Definition of vitiate in English:

vitiate

Line breaks: viti|ate
Pronunciation: /ˈvɪʃɪeɪt
 
/

verb

[with object] formal
1Spoil or impair the quality or efficiency of: development programmes have been vitiated by the rise in population
More example sentences
  • But in this same answer, that great saint recounts another admirable example of a great zeal, proceeding from a very good soul, which was however spoilt and vitiated by the excess of anger which it had stirred up.
  • To what extent will imperfect, but still good, administration vitiate the efficiency properties of the tax?
  • While O'Herlihy's panel gives his show more depth, the comedy programme presented by Keane and Taylor is vitiated by a cacophony of voices.
1.1Destroy or impair the legal validity of: the insurance is vitiated because of foolish acts on the part of the tenant
More example sentences
  • This does not mean that every deviation from procedural regularity and legal correctness vitiates a jury's verdict of guilty.
  • For reasons already given we do not accept that the judge's self-direction was vitiated by legal misdirection.
  • And why should he be made bankrupt if his apparent inability to pay is vitiated by the counterclaim or cross-demand?

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin vitiat- 'impaired', from the verb vitiare, from vitium (see vice1).

Derivatives

vitiation

Pronunciation: /-ˈeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • A bad guy is no longer simply the opposite of ‘good guy;’ the ensuing but signals the vitiation of the villainous sting of depravity.
  • While not leading to automatic vitiation of the warrant, there remains the need to protect the prior authorization process.
  • Earlier art, music, or literature could reinterpret the Passion over and over again without vitiation.

vitiator

noun
More example sentences
  • They always intend to derive political mileage and are true vitiators of India's progress.
  • Overindulgence was the vitiator of Junior's previously sweet disposition.

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Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflɪp(ə)nt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude