Definition of vocative in English:

vocative

Line breaks: voca|tive
Pronunciation: /ˈvɒkətɪv
 
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Grammar

adjective

  • Relating to or denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives in Latin and other languages, used in addressing or invoking a person or thing.
    More example sentences
    • The vocative form is used with frequent appeals by name to the writer's friend ‘Molly.’

noun

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  • 1A word in the vocative case.
    More example sentences
    • Women tend to use such words as adorable, cute, lovely, sweet in describing people and objects and such vocatives as my dear, darling, sweetie.
    • There's also the question of which adjectives can be used as nicknames, like ‘Slim’, ‘Red’, and so on - these can of course also be used as vocatives.
    • He begins with the vocative attributed to Aristotle by Montaigne and others: ‘O my friends, there are no friends!’
  • 1.1 (the vocative) The vocative case.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French vocatif, -ive or Latin vocativus, from vocare 'to call'.

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Pronunciation: meɪdʒ
noun
a magician or learned person