Definition of voyeur in English:

voyeur

Line breaks: voy¦eur
Pronunciation: /vwʌˈjəː
 
, vɔɪ-/

noun

  • 1A person who gains sexual pleasure from watching others when they are naked or engaged in sexual activity: he stood transfixed, a voyeur feasting on the swell of her buttocks
    More example sentences
    • Brendan Fletcher plays a teen voyeur who likes to spy on gay men having sex in a park.
    • Porn voyeurs are in for a treat next month, with the promise of a record-breaking online orgy.
    • From being the object of voyeurism Magda becomes the voyeur, and from being the loved one turns into the lover.
  • 1.1A person who enjoys seeing the pain or distress of others: a voyeur of death murder trials make us voyeurs
    More example sentences
    • We watch like greedy voyeurs as he walks away from the world and its troubles.
    • I feel like a reluctant voyeur, watching a flower die in heart wrenching, time lapse photography.
    • Obviously many men did not survive the crashes I witnessed, and I felt a bit like a voyeur watching it on screen.

Derivatives

voyeurism

noun
More example sentences
  • James Stewart plays a wheelchair-bound photographer whose voyeurism involves him in a murder.
  • Exhibitionism and voyeurism are two sides of the same coin.
  • There is often an element of voyeurism in our interest in interior design, especially when it involves a delicious peep inside the homes of the rich and famous.

voyeuristic

Pronunciation: /-ˈrɪstɪk/
adjective
More example sentences
  • That's what shocks and thrills the public, if only in a sickening, voyeuristic, train wreck sort of way.
  • I would regard myself as partly voyeuristic - that's almost unavoidable if you're a photographer.
  • Most of them are men, with Von Hagens explaining that he did not want to expose himself to criticism that he was putting on a voyeuristic show of naked women.

voyeuristically

Pronunciation: /-ˈrɪstɪk(ə)li/
adverb
More example sentences
  • The audience is taken in by this and voyeuristically watches someone else's fantasy world spill out over the stage.
  • Some critics have seen in these sensual and voyeuristically conceived nudes the only full expression of Ingres's artistic imagination.
  • Generally, we don't get inside the character's heads - instead we view everything from outside, voyeuristically.

Origin

early 20th century: from French, from voir 'see'.

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