There are 4 definitions of wag in English:

wag1

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verb (wags, wagging, wagged)

1(Especially with reference to an animal’s tail) move or cause to move rapidly to and fro: [no object]: his tail began to wag [with object]: the dog went out, wagging its tail
More example sentences
  • Then I come back, and the tails wag so hard that it begins with the middle of their dog bodies.
  • Apparently tails are wagging over the show, as it has been renewed for another season.
  • The climbers soon ski up to us, red plastic sleds wagging like tails behind them.
Synonyms
swing, sway, shake, move to and fro, swish, switch, quiver, twitch, flutter, waver, whip; oscillate, vibrate, undulate
1.1 [with object] Move (an upwards-pointing finger) from side to side to signify disapproval: she wagged a finger at Elinor
More example sentences
  • The others looked at him, and he raised one hand to wag an index finger under Kaeritha's nose.
  • Instead wag a disapproving finger at the bull run in commodities.
  • Siya pretended to be disappointed and wagged her finger at Mel.
Synonyms

noun

Back to top  
A single rapid movement from side to side: a chirpy wag of the head
More example sentences
  • She looked up at him sadly, acknowledging his gesture with a half wag of her tail.
  • No matter how many Chechens may be slaughtered, we content ourselves with a polite wag of the finger, shrug our shoulders, then concede that massacre is an internal matter.
  • But the crowning glory is when the pointer turns around and gives an approving look and tail wag before he trots off to pick up another bird.
Synonyms
swing, sway, shake, swish, switch, quiver, twitch, flutter, waver, whip, oscillation, vibration, undulationwaggle, wiggle, wobble, wave, shake, flourish, brandish

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): from the Germanic base of Old English wagian 'to sway'.

Phrases

how the world wags

dated How affairs are going or being conducted: there is no very good theory of how the world wags these days
More example sentences
  • And because we know that this is how the world wags - that even the least networked of us is connected to everyone if he is connected to at least one other person.
  • The second stage knows how the world wags but not why.
  • I want you to be curious about how the world wags its tail in different lands.

the tail wags the dog

see tail1.

tongues wag

Used to convey that people are gossiping about someone or something: this is a small island and tongues are beginning to wag
More example sentences
  • In 1866 Cosima moved in with Wagner on Lake Lucerne, and they let the tongues wag.
  • So far that hasn't happened, but Kane's deliberately low profile to date has set tongues wagging.
  • I worry endlessly about what other people think about me; I didn't want the tongues to start wagging.

More definitions of wag

Definition of wag in:

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Word of the day conspicuous
Pronunciation: kənˈspɪkjʊəs
adjective
clearly visible

There are 4 definitions of wag in English:

wag2

Line breaks: wag

noun

dated
A person who makes jokes: one wag shouted, ‘On that count you’ve got about three supporters!’
More example sentences
  • Janey was sure that it was a joke by the wags in the Forensics labs - well reasonably sure.
  • At one point a wag from the crowd shouted ‘Is there a footballer in the house?’
  • Some wags joked that the ‘9 on Nine’ panel looked like some sort of reality television show.

verb (wags, wagging, wagged)

[with object] Australian/NZ informal Back to top  
Play truant from (school).
More example sentences
  • We got caught out when we were wagging school, a police officer had caught us in town.
  • The next day, after another sleepless night of coughing, we both decided to wag work and uni.
  • Children wagged school and chased each other through the flooded streets, while their parents headed to the centre of town to see the damage.

Origin

mid 16th century (denoting a young man or mischievous boy, also used as a term of endearment to an infant): probably from obsolete waghalter 'person likely to be hanged' (see wag1, halter1). The verb dates from the late 20th century.

More definitions of wag

Definition of wag in:

There are 4 definitions of wag in English:

WAG1

Line breaks: WAG

noun

informal
A wife or girlfriend of a sports player, typically characterized as having a high media profile and a glamorous lifestyle.

Origin

early 21st century: from the acronym WAGs 'wives and girlfriends'.

There are 4 definitions of wag in English:

WAG2

Line breaks: WAG

abbreviation

Gambia (international vehicle registration).

Origin

from West Africa Gambia.