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wain

Line breaks: wain
Pronunciation: /weɪn
 
/

Definition of wain in English:

noun

archaic
1A wagon or cart.
Example sentences
  • Out of the East men were moving endlessly: swordsmen, spearmen, bowmen upon horses, chariots of chieftains and laden wains.
  • At times, the road was little more than a narrow trail, and loaded wains had great difficulty passing through these bottlenecks, having to smash their way through dense underbrush.
  • You would have heard the marching feet of soldiers then, and the rumble of hooves and the creak of the wheels of wains.
1.1 (the Wain) short for Charles's Wain.

Origin

Old English wæg(e)n, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wagen and German Wagen, also to way and weigh1.

More
  • wagon from (Late Middle English):

    The Dutch word wagen is the source of our wagon. It is related to wain (Old English), an old word for ‘wagon’ that is now mainly encountered in the name of a star formation Charles's Wain, now more commonly called the Plough. Wainscot (Middle English) is from Middle Low German wagenschot, apparently from wagen ‘wagon’ and schot, probably meaning ‘partition’. If you are on the wagon you are avoiding alcohol. The original version of this expression was on the water wagon, which first appeared in America in the early 20th century. A water wagon was a sort of barrel on wheels which was used to water dusty streets. These vehicles had been around since the early 18th century at least, but it may have been the increasing popularity of the temperance movement in the latter part of the 19th century that gave rise to the phrase. See also hitch

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Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
adjective
dark; shadowy or obscure