There are 2 main definitions of weal in English:

weal1

Line breaks: weal
Pronunciation: /wiːl
 
/
(also chiefly Medicine wheal)

noun

1A red, swollen mark left on flesh by a blow or pressure: she slapped his cheek and a bright red weal sprang up on it
More example sentences
  • I sat in it once when they were picking tomatoes, my feet dangling, the ridge of the seat hurting my thighs, making red weals.
  • Their idea of a fun Saturday afternoon is to go paintballing and end up covered in golfball-sized red weals from being shot at close range.
  • You could always tell where she'd been in the school, you just followed the red weals on the legs of the kids.
Synonyms
welt, wound, lesion, swelling;
scar, cicatrix, mark, blemish, discoloration, pockmark
1.1 Medicine An area of the skin which is temporarily raised, typically reddened, and usually accompanied by itching.
More example sentences
  • This causes inflammation and fluid to gather under the skin, causing wheals and the blood vessels to dilate.
  • The wheals can itch, and they look like mosquito bites.
  • A positive skin test was defined as a weal of at least 3 mm in any dimension.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Mark with a weal: his neck was wealed and raw
More example sentences
  • The veterinary officer will report to the stewards after the race every horse which is wealed.
  • After this the boy's bottom would have been wealed, but probably not much bruised.

Origin

early 19th century: variant of wale, influenced by obsolete wheal 'suppurate'.

Definition of weal in:

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There are 2 main definitions of weal in English:

weal2

Line breaks: weal
Pronunciation: /wiːl
 
/

noun

[mass noun] formal
That which is best for someone or something: I am holding this trial behind closed doors in the public weal
More example sentences
  • There is no way for a democratic regime to prevent the citizens from watching and participating in exchanges of ideas, even if these are often half-baked or biassed, and not aimed at public weal.
  • This President has largely excused the rich and powerful from the onerous burden of lightening their wads a tiny bit for the public weal - with a resulting plunge in Treasury receipts.
  • Positions of trust were designated to all members of this Parliament, singly and corporately, who were seen as guardians of the public weal.

Origin

Old English wela 'wealth, well-being', of West Germanic origin; related to well1.

Phrases

the common weal

The benefit or interests of all members of a country or community: such things as police protection and national defence are benefits vital to the common weal
More example sentences
  • Their task is to articulate implicitly, even unconsciously, the necessity for improving the common weal.
  • Here every man, eschewing the pursuit of private interest, would devote himself to the common weal.
  • The problem is how to make the best use of them for the common weal.

Definition of weal in: