Definition of whinge in English:

whinge

Line breaks: whinge
Pronunciation: /wɪn(d)ʒ
 
/
British informal

verb (whinges, whingeing or whinging, whinged)

[no object]

noun

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Derivatives

whingeingly

adverb
More example sentences
  • They, whingeingly pointing out that he is at heart a country boy, who desires nothing more than to be relieved of his military duties and return to his farm to look after his cattle.
  • Lacking dynamics or control, he manages a tune - but he manages it weedily, whingeingly and, sadly, completely indistinguishably from the hordes of similar dewy, forlornsome boys wandering our wastelands.
  • Morris is whingeingly self-justifying and at odds with himself.

whinger

noun
More example sentences
  • More evidence that our business leaders are simply whingers and moaners: New Zealand has maintained its third place ranking in the annual Economic Freedom of the World report.
  • Fred said: ‘This is typical of the Worsley whingers who complain about everything.’
  • Let all keep it up and hope that the carpers and whingers will see the light and come on board.

whingy

(also whingey) adjective (whingier, whingiest)
More example sentences
  • And it's full of all those sheitgeist phrases like compassion inflation, and it doubtless drones on and on in quite a whingy way about victim culture, and how terribly unfair it is.
  • That if she's whingy and clingy, then I'm whingy and clingy.
  • In general, he's happy enough in himself - a bit whingy but otherwise playing happily, stopping for a hacking cough every now and then.

Origin

late Old English hwinsian, of Germanic origin; related to German winseln; compare with whine.

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