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whoosh

Line breaks: whoosh
Pronunciation: /wʊʃ
 
, wuːʃ
 
/
(also woosh)

Definition of whoosh in English:

verb

Move quickly or suddenly with a rushing sound: [no object, with adverbial of direction]: a train whooshed by
More example sentences
  • And the channel rail link wasn't even a dream then, but now runs through a cutting at the bottom of the village, with trains whooshing past every half hour of so.
  • One of the persistent legends that attaches to Saville, is that, like the author Douglas Adams, he loves the sound of deadlines whooshing past.
  • I stopped talking, and relaxed in the cushy seat to hear the light whooshing sound of the train speeding along the track.

noun

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A sudden movement accompanied by a rushing sound: there was a big whoosh of air
More example sentences
  • Most electronic music is still founded on blips, bleeps, whooshes, and other ‘spacey’ sounds.
  • Or is it a triple CD packed full of interminable electronic bleeps and whooshes, both inaccessible and incomprehensible?
  • Even the instrumental is all atmospheric whooshes and no concrete melodies.

exclamation

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Used to imitate sudden movement accompanied by a rushing sound: the starlings gather, then suddenly—whoosh!—flocks rise and swirl
More example sentences
  • And then, just when he has finished building a double-digit lead in the polls, whoosh!
  • The Cape Cod trip seems to have dislodged some old memories - they come crashing down, a bit like watching the polar caps give way, whoosh!
  • You know in old movies, they'd have a calendar that used to go whoosh!

Origin

mid 19th century: imitative.

Definition of whoosh in:

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