Definition of wide in English:

wide

Line breaks: wide
Pronunciation: /wʌɪd
 
/

adjective (wider, widest)

  • 1Of great or more than average width: a wide road
    More example sentences
    • Why should the chosen few have this enormously wide road to themselves?
    • The roads are still wide, though traffic density is much lower.
    • Otherwise they will not need so many one-ways even on wide roads.
    Synonyms
    broad, extensive, spacious, open, vast, spread out, outspreadbaggy, loose, capacious, roomy, ample, full, generous, generously cut, commodious, voluminous, oversize; slack, sloppy, shapeless, sack-like, ill-fitting, ballooning, billowing, floppy
  • 1.1(After a measurement and in questions) from side to side: it measures 15 cm long by 12 cm wide how wide do you think this house is?
    More example sentences
    • Walking along lines 1m wide, a measurement was taken at each 0.5m step.
    • Built in 1935, it has eight-foot wide verandahs on three sides of both storeys.
    • The expedition also found rings of plankton organisms that measured 10 km wide.
  • 1.2Open to the full extent: his eyes were wide with fear
    More example sentences
    • The boy underneath me was staring at me with wide eyes full of fear.
    • She pushed herself up into a sitting position and looked at Emily with wide eyes full of fear.
    • That's all I can say, he's got a wide grin and full cheeks, not chubby, just open.
    Synonyms
    fully open, gaping, agape, wide open, yawning
  • 1.3Considerable: tax revenues have undershot Treasury projections by a wide margin
    More example sentences
    • Just as the Bank of England has a target for inflation and has to write a letter to the chancellor if it misses it by a wide margin, the new rule seeks to establish credibility.
    • But not by the wide margin that many pundits were predicting.
    • Needwood Spirit has been at the top of his form in recent weeks and has gained a brace of victories at Carlisle, his latest success being achieved by a wide margin.
  • 2Including a great variety of people or things: a wide range of opinion his wide circle of friends
    More example sentences
    • The discussions ranged over a wide variety of subjects, but it was the philosophy of medicine that attracted the largest numbers.
    • Today a wide range of fresh varieties such as plum, cherry and vine tomatoes are readily available.
    • The colorful, long-lasting blossoms of this wide variety of mums range from one to six inches across.
    Synonyms
  • 2.1Spread among a large number of people or over a large area: the government’s desire for wider share ownership
    More example sentences
    • This proposal has got wide acceptance among women who came to attend the meeting.
    • Gitt, incredibly, replied that his ideas have wide acceptance among scientists.
    • The language papers with wide readership in rural areas have responded admirably to the hardships faced by farmers in their own way.
  • 2.2Considering or dealing with the more general aspects of a situation, issue, etc.: the wider implications of the dispute
    More example sentences
    • This debate raises wide issues of political theory concerning the proper role of the state.
    • It frequently carries topics and issues of wide import that get into the mainstream papers months or years later.
    • If a court was entitled to look at wide social issues, then really what is being said is that the court's role is a discretionary one.
  • 2.3 [in combination] Extending over the whole of: an industry-wide trend
  • 3At a considerable or specified distance from an intended point or target: the ball was wide of the leg stump
    More example sentences
    • Her shot was wide but Gallagher was there to pick up the loose ball.
    • A minute later and again Eynsford breached the visitors' defence but the final shot was wide.
  • 3.1(Especially in soccer) at or near the side of the field: he played in a wide left position
    More example sentences
    • That this has improvement has come since he has been tucked into the centre of midfield from a wide right position may not be a coincidence.
    • He has been getting in some great positions either behind their midfield or out wide and he has been a good supply line for us recently.
    • With a wide midfielder and full-back to double up on the exposed full-back this tactic should generate the crosses needed to threaten.

adverb

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  • 1To the full extent: his eyes opened wide
    More example sentences
    • Flowers open wide in full sun, and with the central yellow anthers, the effect is striking.
    • There was a Chinese guy, who's bag I assume it was, taunting it by opening his mouth really wide and moving his arms up and down, but the bird was having none of it.
    • And the second thing is, Lindy walked into the room the other day and he opened his arms wide to reach out to her.
    Synonyms
    fully, to the fullest/furthest extent, as far/much as possible, all the way, completelyfully open, open wide, gaping, agape, yawning, cavernous
  • 2Far from a particular or intended point or target: his final touchline conversion drifted wide
    More example sentences
    • On 11 minutes, the visitors thought that they had taken the lead but a cracking effort went inches wide of the target.
    • Sutton directed a free header wide of the target, and with 12 minutes left, the visitors scored a third.
    • They upped the tempo somewhat but were guilty of ballooning some bad balls wide of their intended mark.
    Synonyms
    off target, wide of the mark/target, off course, inaccurately, astray
    informal off beam
  • 2.1(Especially in football) at or near the side of the field: he will play wide on the right
    More example sentences
    • Some nice first time football leaves Ballack wide on the left, from where he strokes a cross in.
    • The ball had been switched from side to side before finally Stark was given the scoring pass wide on the right.
    • ORs hit back straight away when Tom Jones scored wide in the corner to take the home side through to the next round.

noun

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  • (also wide ball) Cricket A ball that is judged to be too wide of the stumps for the batsman to play, for which an extra is awarded to the batting side.
    More example sentences
    • Blignaut lost his cool immediately, the next ball swinging way down the leg side for four wides.
    • The batsmen were also helped by some wayward bowling with 61 extras, including 40 wides, being conceded.
    • Instead, the bowlers bowled a few wides and no-balls, in addition to the batsmen being lucky with a few edges.

Phrases

give someone/thing a wide berth

see berth.

wide awake

Fully awake.
More example sentences
  • I was wide awake yet my conscious brain was refusing to accept that someone unseen was touching my face.
  • I am incensed, I am livid, I am wide awake at 3.20 in the morning Thursday writing this email.
  • At 3.30 I was still wide awake and feeling incredibly bad tempered.
Synonyms
fully awake, conscious, open-eyed, not asleep, sleepless, unsleeping, insomniac
archaic watchful

wide of the mark

see off the mark at mark1.
More example sentences
  • If Uki is half asleep and throws his punches a mile wide of the mark, how can Tori possibly practise his techniques affectively and safely?
  • He threw the javelin indeed with prodigious force, but threw it wholly wide of the mark.

wide open

  • 1Fully open: the door was wide open
    More example sentences
    • The wallet of the eventual buyer will also have to fall wide open.
    • Above, the ancient door of massive timber in good preservation, being wide open, I walked in.
    • The way he seemed to be squinting with his eyes wide open.
  • 2Very vulnerable, unprotected: the system is wide open to fraud
    More example sentences
    • Once it does, his body is left wide open for an attack.
    • Once again the national media were operating off the philosophy that if a person has been involved in controversy they are wide open for attack.
    • This left my stomach and chest wide open for attack, and he lunged forward.
  • 3(Of an issue or contest) completely unresolved: the election is wide open with six candidates in serious contention for the seats
    More example sentences
    • After recent years where one or two teams have dominated the league, it is welcoming to see a genuine three horse title race, and the surprise results that have blown the contest wide open.
    • The straw poll of parliamentary party members last week showed no clear winner emerging leaving the contest wide open.
    • The contest was wide open at the break, but the Borderers made full use of the wind in the second half to eventually seal a deserved win.

Derivatives

wideness

noun
More example sentences
  • In its conception, America was a furious dream, and when you are not a child of its luxuries from birth, you see that in all its wideness.
  • Hour after hour of wideness, mountain ranges and plains, terrain that doesn't so much have features as textures.
  • With regard to the wideness of the roads in Wellington, we certainly wish some were a little wider, but they do add to the character of the city.

widish

adjective
More example sentences
  • The wicketkeeper also played his part with a superb catch as the Tasmanian swished at the widish delivery.
  • The opener fished at a widish delivery, edging it to Parthiv Patel behind the stumps.
  • But then, such is the talent level of this gifted left-hander that he can effortlessly caress a widish delivery past the ropes, and thump a lightning quick yorker to the fence!

Origin

Old English wīd 'spacious, extensive', wīde 'over a large area', of Germanic origin.

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Pronunciation: mɪˈlɔːd
noun
used to address an English nobleman