There are 2 definitions of wig in English:

wig1

Line breaks: wig
Pronunciation: /wɪg
 
/

noun

  • A covering for the head made of real or artificial hair, typically worn by judges and barristers in law courts or by people trying to conceal their baldness.
    More example sentences
    • Real hair wigs are definitely the better option for people who need a wig because of hair loss.
    • A thick braid of hair hung just above the bench's surface, looking more like a wig than real hair.
    • Pins that are used to penetrate hairpieces or wigs are often referred to as T-pin or wig hair pins.

Derivatives

wigged

adjective
[usually in combination]: a blonde-wigged woman
More example sentences
  • For most people the term ‘common law’ summons up quaint images of wigged British judges and piles of dusty law books.
  • The photo had been altered so that between the doctors peering down at the operation is a wigged and gowned barrister.
  • Mr. Darnay tells Sydney Carton, the wigged gentleman who resembles him (and who is an attorney working for the defense), to tell Miss Manette that he is deeply sorry to have been the cause of her agitation.

wigless

adjective
More example sentences
  • One party's negotiator says his abiding memory of the Good Friday talks was of her walking the corridors shoeless, wigless (she wore a wig after radiotherapy) and carrying a bottle of champagne in her hand.
  • For more than five years, the wigless - solicitors - have been demanding the same rights as their wig-wearing brethren - the barristers - to litigate in the High Court and the Court of Final Appeal.
  • Upon his arrival on a hot February Sydney day, Dowling disembarked to an eleven-gun salute and was greeted by a gowned but wigless Chief Justice.

Origin

late 17th century: shortening of periwig.

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Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skəʊʃ
noun
a small amount; a little

There are 2 definitions of wig in English:

wig2

Line breaks: wig
Pronunciation: /wɪg
 
/

verb (wigs, wigging, wigged)

  • [with object] British informal , • dated Rebuke (someone) severely: I had often occasion to wig him for getting drunk
    More example sentences
    • It was as the Daily Chronicle interviewer was leaving that Khama gently wigged him with humorous but earnest words of warning.

Phrasal verbs

wig out

informal , chiefly US Become deliriously excited; go completely wild: watch out—I may just wig out (as adjective wigged-out) wigged-out dancing
More example sentences
  • It's because those organizations have discredited themselves by consistently siding against America and wigging out about fashionable lefty causes.
  • But the long and the short of it was that the baby boomer's father lit up and proceeded to wig out.
  • She seemed resigned rather than annoyed, and although I was wigging out at the thought of another month in my current state, what could I do?

Origin

early 19th century: apparently from wig1, perhaps from bigwig and associated with a rebuke given by a person in authority.

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Definition of wig in: