There are 2 definitions of wince in English:

wince1

Line breaks: wince
Pronunciation: /wɪns
 
/

verb

[no object]

noun

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Derivatives

wincer

noun
More example sentences
  • There is a sprinkling of hobblers, plenty of wincers, and almost universal hollow eyes and messed hair.
  • Now I have a dream that the primary school children of today might grow up in a nation that does not know wincers and eye rollers.
  • Although Maurice is mentioned prominently on a website called Speed Trap Exchange, the wincers would say that, strictly speaking, Maurice does not operate a speed trap.

wincing

adjective
More example sentences
  • But, lo, Irn magnanimously welcomed him back into the fold with a wincing smile.
  • I ignored his wincing and regretful face, carrying on with my ranting.

wincingly

adverb
More example sentences
  • A Scots comedian's wincingly accurate portrayal of life inside the corridors of power depicting a downtrodden minister and a bullying spin doctor has already received widespread acclaim.
  • Mind you, I wouldn't mind not hearing some of the local ads, which can be wincingly bad.
  • While wincingly memorable and undoubtedly made by an historic personage, it has no historical significance in the sense we understand.

Origin

Middle English (originally in the sense 'kick restlessly from pain or impatience'): from an Anglo-Norman French variant of Old French guenchir 'turn aside'.

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Word of the day grotesquerie
Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively

There are 2 definitions of wince in English:

wince2

Line breaks: wince
Pronunciation: /wɪns
 
/

noun

British
  • A roller for moving textile fabric through a dyeing vat.
    More example sentences
    • The Hengst was fitted on one side with a wooden winch, the ‘wince’, and could be fastened to the side of the vat or copper by means of a rod into which it was driven.
    • Sometimes the ebullition is kept up for a quarter of an hour; the pieces all the while being turned over a wince, from one side of the copper vessel to the other.

Origin

late 17th century (in the sense 'winch'): variant of winch.

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