There are 2 definitions of wise in English:

wise1

Line breaks: wise
Pronunciation: /wʌɪz
 
/

adjective

verb

[no object] (wise up) [often in imperative] informal Back to top  
  • Become aware of or informed about something: wise up to the flavours of North Africa
    More example sentences
    • Forever desperate to present his charges as potential world-beaters four years down the line, he should wise up to the fact that moulding them into a team merely tough to beat might be as good as it can get.
    • The public are wising up because if recent past elections are anything to go by apathetic turn outs just keep getting worse.
    • We are wising up to such something-for-nothing marketing schemes which turn out to be the opposite.

Phrases

be wise after the event

Understand and assess a situation only after its implications have become obvious: it is easy to be wise after the event
More example sentences
  • Reflecting on the time of my involvement there were some key decisions on player contracts in 1999 that we know now were mistakes, but it's easy to be wise after the event.
  • While it would be easy to be wise after the event, Simon was never a player that any of us would have picked out as a future star, as a player who would go all the way to the top.
  • It is easy to be wise after the event and almost impossible before it

be none (or not any) the wiser

Not understand something, even though it has been explained: she said an awful lot but he wasn’t any the wiser I am still none the wiser about the meaning of the word
More example sentences
  • The whole issue gets me totally annoyed and I'm still none the wiser as to what value we get from paying them at all.
  • Both airlines could have simply increased their prices by $6, and most customers would be none the wiser.
  • If I want to ruin the reputation of a B-list celeb I could so with in a couple of days, and their PR agency would be none the wiser until the stories started appearing.

Derivatives

wisely

adverb
More example sentences
  • This is real money, money that could be used to build hospitals and schools at home, so it is vital that it is spent wisely.
  • By giving wisely your gifts will go further with a helping hand from the taxman, and can even help you cut your own tax bills.
  • And you will need to be ruthless in analysing whether they are spending their money wisely.

Origin

Old English wīs, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wijs and German weise, also to wit2.

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Word of the day grotesquerie
Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively

There are 2 definitions of wise in English:

wise2

Line breaks: wise
Pronunciation: /wʌɪz
 
/

noun

archaic
  • The manner or extent of something: he did it this wise

Phrases

in no wise

Not at all.
More example sentences
  • The ‘welcome’ signs, artfully disposed, make it clear that hospitality is merely an allusive flavor; they are in no wise meant to be taken literally.
  • ‘Him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out ‘.
  • Yes, I rule on it and my ruling is that I am in no wise disqualified from hearing the case.

Origin

Old English wīse, of Germanic origin; related to wit2.

More definitions of wise

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