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wold

Line breaks: wold
Pronunciation: /wəʊld
 
/

Definition of wold in English:

noun

[often in place names] (usually wolds)
(In Britain) a piece of high, open uncultivated land or moor: the Lincolnshire Wolds
More example sentences
  • Separate ice fields also encroached from the North Sea, driving eastwards through what is now the Vale Of Pickering and covering much of the East Yorkshire plain, leaving the moors and wolds as isolated highlands.
  • Numerous streams running from springs on the wolds down towards the River Hull have helped shape Beverley's streets.
  • We've moved into a period of April showers, alternating between bright sunshine and sharp, sudden downpours as the wind sweeps from the West over the wolds and down across the fens towards the sea.

Origin

Old English wald 'wooded upland', of Germanic origin; perhaps related to wild. Compare with Weald.

More
  • wild from (Old English):

    Both wild and wilderness are Old English words. The first sense of wild was ‘not tame or domesticated’, and wilderness means literally ‘land inhabited only by wild animals’—it comes from Old English wild dēor ‘wild deer’. This is the sense in The Call of the Wild ( 1903), a novella by the American writer Jack London about a pet sold as a sled dog that returns to the wild to lead a pack of wolves. To the Anglo-Saxons wildfire was originally a raging, destructive fire caused by a lightning strike. It was also a mixture of highly flammable substances used in warfare, and a term for various skin diseases that spread quickly over the body. Use of spread like wildfire was suggested by Shakespeare's line in his poem The Rape of Lucrece: ‘Whose words like wild fire burnt the shining glorie / Of rich-built Illion [Troy]’. A wild goose chase does not come from hunting. Early examples, dating from the late 16th century, refer to a popular sport of the time in which each of a line of riders had to follow accurately the course of the leader, like a flight of wild geese. The wooded uplands know as wolds (Old English), as in Cotswolds, or wealds are probably from the same root. See also deer, voice, west, wool

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