There are 2 definitions of woof in English:

woof1

Line breaks: woof
Pronunciation: /wʊf
 
/

noun

The barking sound made by a dog: the distant woof of a dog [as exclamation]: a dog never learns to go ‘Woof!’
More example sentences
  • There are many barks in the distance - yips vs woofs, neither of which is Jasper's.
  • The animal's footfalls seemed to echo in the woofs as the boy continued to listen intently.
  • Today, I got in a great workout, some brunch, some used clothes shopping, and a few whistles and woofs from the locals.

verb

Back to top  
1 [no object] (Of a dog) bark: the dog started to woof
More example sentences
  • I understand that when dogs woof, they may be saying one of several things.
  • The dog woofed and waived his tail, staring imploringly at his master.
  • Other dogs sit tethered to benches, and occasionally woof at competing mutts, but Jasper whines and barks the entire time.
1.1US black slang Say something in a boastful or aggressive manner: mister, you weren’t just woofing— you can cook
More example sentences
  • Jackson also is extremely loyal to his players, including Kobe - who has publicly defied his coach and even woofed at him when his selfishness was questioned during a timeout recently.
2 [with object] informal Eat (food) ravenously: Mike was woofing down fried eggs and hash browns
More example sentences
  • Ah just download and have a listen, it's Friday morning and there's tea and toast to be woofed…
  • Thai families are woofing down servings of roast squid, fish balls and sticky rice.
  • Mike asked the entire group after we had finished woofing down our lunch.

Origin

early 19th century: imitative.

Definition of woof in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day salmanazar
Pronunciation: ˌsalməˈneɪzə
noun
a wine bottle twelve times the standard size...

There are 2 definitions of woof in English:

woof2

Line breaks: woof
Pronunciation: /wuːf
 
/

noun

Another term for weft1.
More example sentences
  • The figure is formed, as in damask, by the warp overlapping several threads of the woof.
  • It is altogether possible that we may see far-reaching changes in the basic structure of our Government, in the woof of our political thinking.
  • Understanding that, like everything before us, we will rot our way back into the woof and warp of the planet.

Origin

Old English ōwef, a compound from the base of weave1; Middle English oof later became woof by association with warp in the phrase warp and woof.

Definition of woof in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day salmanazar
Pronunciation: ˌsalməˈneɪzə
noun
a wine bottle twelve times the standard size...