There are 2 main definitions of wotcha in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

wotcha1

Line breaks: wotcha
Pronunciation: /ˈwɒtʃə
 
/
(also wotcher)

exclamation

British informal
Used as a friendly or humorous greeting: wotcha, Dunc—thanks for turning out
More example sentences
  • I've liked her ever since she met Harry with that "Wotcha, Harry!"
  • It would go so easy right now to turn around and go ‘Wotcha Judy,’ while flashing his recognisable grin.

Origin

late 19th century: corruption of what cheer?.

More
  • cheer from (Middle English):

    In medieval English the word cheer meant ‘face’, coming ultimately from Greek kara ‘head’. People came to use it to refer to the expression on someone's face, and hence to their mood or demeanour. This could be in either a positive or negative sense; you could talk, for example, about a person's ‘sorrowful cheer’ or ‘heavy cheer’. ‘What cheer?’ was once a common greeting meaning ‘how are you?’, and in the 19th century this eventually became worn down to wotcha. Over time cheer developed the specific meaning of ‘a good mood’ and then ‘a shout of encouragement or joy’. A Bronx cheer is a rude noise made by blowing through closed lips with the tongue between them—what is also called a raspberry.

Words that rhyme with wotcha

botcher, gotcha, top-notcher, watcher

Share this entry

Share this page

 

There are 2 main definitions of wotcha in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

wotcha2

Line breaks: wotcha
Pronunciation: /ˈwɒtʃə
 
/
(also watcha)

exclamation

informal
1What are you ... hey, wotcha gonna do?
More example sentences
  • Hahaha, watcha gonna do now dat the girl's hurt?
  • Hey boo, wotcha doing standing outside in the cold like that.
  • The nurse blew a bubble at me, ‘Then watcha up here for?’
1.1What have you ... wotcha got this hammer for then?
More example sentences
  • "Watcha got there, Babe," I say and she laughs.
  • "Hey Light, watcha found out about this whole Kagato thing?" Ryuk asked.
1.2What do you ... wotcha want to make a mess like that for?
More example sentences
  • Tell me watcha want, watcha really really want.
  • My heart will pump medechlorians, either way, watcha want me to say.

Origin

1920s: contraction.

More
  • cheer from (Middle English):

    In medieval English the word cheer meant ‘face’, coming ultimately from Greek kara ‘head’. People came to use it to refer to the expression on someone's face, and hence to their mood or demeanour. This could be in either a positive or negative sense; you could talk, for example, about a person's ‘sorrowful cheer’ or ‘heavy cheer’. ‘What cheer?’ was once a common greeting meaning ‘how are you?’, and in the 19th century this eventually became worn down to wotcha. Over time cheer developed the specific meaning of ‘a good mood’ and then ‘a shout of encouragement or joy’. A Bronx cheer is a rude noise made by blowing through closed lips with the tongue between them—what is also called a raspberry.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.