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xylophone Line breaks: xylo|phone
Pronunciation: /ˈzʌɪləfəʊn/

Definition of xylophone in English:

noun

Image of xylophone
A musical instrument played by striking a row of wooden bars of graduated length with one or more small wooden or plastic beaters.
Example sentences
  • It is a simple ballad with a choirboy singing a melody over a xylophone and soft string orchestral backing.
  • Percussion is composed of sleigh bells, tambourine, xylophone and kettle drums.
  • Here the group combines trombone, a simplistic guitar line, and what sounds like either a marimba or a xylophone.

Derivatives

xylophonic

1
Pronunciation: /zʌɪləˈfɒnɪk/
adjective
Example sentences
  • A thick gush of guitar and xylophonic pluck, the vocals are pushed up front for the first time.
  • First the xylophonic tinkering, then the thunderous drums, instantly knock you out.
  • In the drain, hidden by foliage, ducks clacked a quacky, xylophonic tune.

xylophonist

2
Pronunciation: /zʌɪˈlɒfənɪst/
noun
Example sentences
  • This biopic about a legendary Thai xylophonist's beautifully shot, but that's about all that can be legitimately praised.
  • In a real players' tour-de-force, this multi-faceted and instrumental band allows all of its members - from guitarist to xylophonists - to contribute to the genial groove going on.
  • Marimba players, xylophonists and other percussionists will be spotlighted as soloists on Handel's ‘Concerto No.5 in F.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from xylo- 'of wood' + -phone.

More
  • This is the only common word formed from Greek xylo- ‘wood’, although it is common enough in science in words such as xylene (mid 19th century) a hydrocarbon made from distilled wood, and archaeologists can describe a single lump of wood as monoxylic (mid 19th century) on the model of monolithic (mid 19th century) for ‘single stone’.

Words that rhyme with xylophone

allophone • Anglophone

Definition of xylophone in:

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