Hay 3 definiciones de beetle en inglés:

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beetle1

Saltos de línea: bee¦tle
Pronunciación: /ˈbiːt(ə)l
 
/

sustantivo

1An insect of a large order distinguished by having forewings that are typically modified into hard wing cases (elytra), which cover and protect the hindwings and abdomen.
Example sentences
  • Among all the insects only beetles have these specialized fore-wings.
  • A variety of insects, including some beetles and moths, mimic bees and wasps.
  • It turns out that only some male horned scarab beetles grow long horns and battle for mates.
Sinónimos
winged insect
technical coleopteran
2 [mass noun] British A dice game in which a picture of a beetle is drawn or assembled.
Example sentences
  • Take turns to roll the dice and gradually build your beetle (you must start with the body).
  • In the old days, we used to meet weekly and ran bingo and beetle drives to raise money.
  • Winnie said she remembered shows being suspended during the Second World Ward and members held a number of whist and beetle drives to keep the group together - and also put together packages for the boys on the front line.

verbo

[no object, with adverbial of direction] informal Volver al principio  
Make one’s way hurriedly: the tourist beetled off
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Between us, we put everything away, the Engineer and his missus beetled off amid cheery cries of ‘No problem’, and I staggered off, cat securely clutched in arms, in search of gin.
  • And off he beetled to the back room he set up a couple of days ago, with a clean workbench and a worklight just right for the assembly of electronic components.
  • And, besides, it gave Graham a place to hide while I beetled over to the display of windchimes and began to put them through their paces.
Sinónimos

Origen

Old English bitula, bitela 'biter', from the base of bītan 'to bite'.

More
  • The meaning of the source word for this creature is ‘biter’, and it is closely related to bite. The other word beetle, ‘a heavy mallet’, is unrelated. It comes ultimately from the ancestor of beat, ‘to strike’. The Beetle is an affectionate name for a type of small Volkswagen car that was first produced in 1938. The term started as a nickname, and was not officially adopted by the company until the 1960s. A review of the car in Motor magazine during 1946 said: ‘It has the civilian saloon body on the military chassis with the higher ground clearance, and it looks rather like a beetle on stilts.’ Beetle-browed means ‘having bushy eyebrows’. In Middle English brow was always an eyebrow and not the forehead; it has been suggested that the comparison is with the tufted antennae of certain beetles, which may have been called eyebrows in both English and French.

Words that rhyme with beetle

betel, chital, decretal, fetal

Definición de beetle en:

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Hay 3 definiciones de beetle en inglés:

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beetle2

Saltos de línea: bee¦tle
Pronunciación: /ˈbiːt(ə)l
 
/

sustantivo

1A very heavy mallet, typically with a wooden head, used for ramming, crushing, etc.
Example sentences
  • Champ was prepared especially for the festival of Hallowe'en when large quantities of potatoes were pounded with a cylindrical wooden implement called a beetle.
2A machine used for heightening the lustre of cloth by pressure from rollers.
Example sentences
  • It worked perfectly - intensity of light was controlled by pressure on the beetle!
  • Depending on the beetle pressure in a stand and individual susceptibility of baited trees, attacks may range from unsuccessful or no attack, to successfully mass attacked.

verbo

[with object] Volver al principio  
1Ram or crush with a beetle: she stood in a shed, beetling grain for the fowl
2Finish (cloth) with a beetle.
Example sentences
  • From sowing to pulling, retting to rippling, spinning to weaving, beetling to bleaching, a long, exhausting and sometimes dangerous business made a cloth so precious it was put under armed guard and cost thieves their lives.

Origen

Old English bētel, of Germanic origin; related to beat.

More
  • The meaning of the source word for this creature is ‘biter’, and it is closely related to bite. The other word beetle, ‘a heavy mallet’, is unrelated. It comes ultimately from the ancestor of beat, ‘to strike’. The Beetle is an affectionate name for a type of small Volkswagen car that was first produced in 1938. The term started as a nickname, and was not officially adopted by the company until the 1960s. A review of the car in Motor magazine during 1946 said: ‘It has the civilian saloon body on the military chassis with the higher ground clearance, and it looks rather like a beetle on stilts.’ Beetle-browed means ‘having bushy eyebrows’. In Middle English brow was always an eyebrow and not the forehead; it has been suggested that the comparison is with the tufted antennae of certain beetles, which may have been called eyebrows in both English and French.

Definición de beetle en:

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Hay 3 definiciones de beetle en inglés:

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beetle3

Saltos de línea: bee¦tle
Pronunciación: /ˈbiːt(ə)l
 
/

verbo

[no object] (usually as adjective beetling)
(Of a rock or a person’s eyebrows) project or overhang: his eyebrows beetled with irritation
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He glared forbiddingly, his eyebrows beetling together like two fuzzy caterpillars were mating on his forehead.
  • And then he began pounding on the table like Kruschev, his eyebrows beetling furiously.
  • His eyebrows beetled, and he slipped into a deep sleep, with the music of Total Package playing in his ears.
Sinónimos

adjetivo

[attributive] Volver al principio  
(Of a person’s eyebrows) shaggy and projecting: thick beetle brows
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • He furrows his beetle brows and fixes his stare on the turf in front, indifferent to the periphery.
  • Beneath the beetle brow and the thinning combover, however, lurked a singular songwriting talent.
  • He turned towards her; his eyes flashing under his beetling eyebrows.

Origen

mid 16th century (as an adjective): back-formation from beetle-browed, first recorded in Middle English. The verb was apparently used as a nonce word by Shakespeare and was later adopted by other writers.

More
  • The meaning of the source word for this creature is ‘biter’, and it is closely related to bite. The other word beetle, ‘a heavy mallet’, is unrelated. It comes ultimately from the ancestor of beat, ‘to strike’. The Beetle is an affectionate name for a type of small Volkswagen car that was first produced in 1938. The term started as a nickname, and was not officially adopted by the company until the 1960s. A review of the car in Motor magazine during 1946 said: ‘It has the civilian saloon body on the military chassis with the higher ground clearance, and it looks rather like a beetle on stilts.’ Beetle-browed means ‘having bushy eyebrows’. In Middle English brow was always an eyebrow and not the forehead; it has been suggested that the comparison is with the tufted antennae of certain beetles, which may have been called eyebrows in both English and French.

Derivados

beetle-browed

1
adjetivo
Example sentences
  • It's as insular as the most beetle-browed peasant in a village on a Russian steppe in the 12 th century.
  • We were an ambulatory species, and had been so ever since our beetle-browed ancestors first strode off to hunt and gather.
  • At such moments, you wonder how she ended up playing such a beetle-browed old cynic as Mel.

Definición de beetle en:

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