Hay 4 definiciones de bully en inglés:

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bully1

Saltos de línea: bully
Pronunciación: /ˈbʊli
 
/

sustantivo (plural bullies)

A person who uses strength or influence to harm or intimidate those who are weaker: he is a ranting, domineering bully
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • If we can all come together to make our parks safe, and we can all support zero tolerance in schools so that our children can enjoy a good education free from fear, intimidation and bullies, then we can surely do the same for our roads.
  • Many coaches are professional bullies and intimidators.
  • They have to worry about a lot more than bullies and bad influences outside the home.
Sinónimos
scourge, tough, heavy, bully boy, ruffian, thug, attack dog
North American informal badass

verbo (bullies, bullying, bullied)

[with object] Volver al principio  
Use superior strength or influence to intimidate (someone), typically to force them to do something: a local man was bullied into helping them
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Once, he was bullied into crawling between the legs of one of them in public.
  • A pregnant mother was spared a prison sentence after she was bullied into drug offences by her estranged partner.
  • I feel that I was bullied into agreeing to take it and I don't think it's the right thing for me.
Sinónimos
persecute, oppress, tyrannize, torment, browbeat, intimidate, cow, coerce, strong-arm, subjugate, domineer
informal push around/about, play the heavy with
coerce, pressure, pressurize, bring pressure to bear on, use pressure on, put pressure on, constrain, lean on, press, push;
force, compel, oblige, put under an obligation;
hound, harass, nag, harry, badger, goad, prod, pester, browbeat, brainwash, bludgeon, persuade, prevail on, work on, act on, influence, intimidate, dragoon, twist someone's arm, strong-arm;
North American blackjack
informal bulldoze, railroad, put the screws/squeeze on
British informal bounce
North American informal hustle, fast-talk

Origen

mid 16th century: probably from Middle Dutch boele 'lover'. Original use was as a term of endearment applied to either sex; it later became a familiar form of address to a male friend. The current sense dates from the late 17th century.

More
  • People originally liked bullies. When it came into the English language in the 16th century, probably from an old Dutch word boele ‘lover’, bully was a term of endearment, much like ‘sweetheart’ or ‘darling’. At the end of the 17th century it was being used to mean ‘admirable or jolly’, and finally the more general sense of ‘first-rate’ developed. Today this survives only in the expression bully for you!, ‘well done! good for you!’ The usual modern sense dates from the late 17th century, probably from its use as an informal way of addressing a male friend, or referring to a ‘lad’ or ‘one of the boys’. The bully of bully beef is a mid 18th-century alteration of French bouilli ‘boiled’.

Words that rhyme with bully

ampullae, bullae, fully, Lully, pulley, Woolley, woolly

Definición de bully en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de bully en inglés:

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bully2

Saltos de línea: bully
Pronunciación: /ˈbʊli
 
/

adjetivo

informal , chiefly North American
Very good; excellent: the statue really looked bully
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It's a bully conclusion to a riveting journey through time.
  • That is why this franchise is the closest yet to possibly, maybe, being that bully team the NFL has lacked since the Cowboys faded almost a decade ago.

Origen

late 16th century (originally used of a person, meaning 'admirable, gallant, jolly'): from bully1. The current sense dates from the mid 19th century.

More
  • People originally liked bullies. When it came into the English language in the 16th century, probably from an old Dutch word boele ‘lover’, bully was a term of endearment, much like ‘sweetheart’ or ‘darling’. At the end of the 17th century it was being used to mean ‘admirable or jolly’, and finally the more general sense of ‘first-rate’ developed. Today this survives only in the expression bully for you!, ‘well done! good for you!’ The usual modern sense dates from the late 17th century, probably from its use as an informal way of addressing a male friend, or referring to a ‘lad’ or ‘one of the boys’. The bully of bully beef is a mid 18th-century alteration of French bouilli ‘boiled’.

Frases

bully for you! (or him etc.)

1
often ironic Used to express admiration or approval: he got away—bully for him!
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Yummy, bully for you!
  • And I say bully for him.
  • Bully for her, and bully for you if you have a similar situation.

Definición de bully en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de bully en inglés:

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bully3

Saltos de línea: bully
Pronunciación: /ˈbʊli
 
/
(also bully beef)

sustantivo

[mass noun] informal
Corned beef.
Example sentences
  • She opened the back door only to see thrown down on the lawn an empty can of her bully beef and, to make matters worse, an empty tin of her cat's food!
  • We had bacon too, bully beef, endless tea, and biscuits which were very hard.
  • They climb over each other, snatching spaghetti, Irish stew and bully beef from the air and each other.

Origen

mid 18th century: alteration of bouilli.

More
  • People originally liked bullies. When it came into the English language in the 16th century, probably from an old Dutch word boele ‘lover’, bully was a term of endearment, much like ‘sweetheart’ or ‘darling’. At the end of the 17th century it was being used to mean ‘admirable or jolly’, and finally the more general sense of ‘first-rate’ developed. Today this survives only in the expression bully for you!, ‘well done! good for you!’ The usual modern sense dates from the late 17th century, probably from its use as an informal way of addressing a male friend, or referring to a ‘lad’ or ‘one of the boys’. The bully of bully beef is a mid 18th-century alteration of French bouilli ‘boiled’.

Definición de bully en:

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Hay 4 definiciones de bully en inglés:

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bully4

Saltos de línea: bully
Pronunciación: /ˈbʊli
 
/

sustantivo (plural bullies)

(also bully off) An act of starting play in field hockey, in which two opponents strike each other’s sticks three times and then go for the ball.
Example sentences
  • Use the bully to put the ball into play when play has been stopped for injury.
  • If there is a stop in action, the re-start is called a Bully.
  • The ball is put in play in midfield in a face-off, known as a bully.

verbo (bullies, bullying, bullied)

[no object] Volver al principio  
(also bully off) (In field hockey) start play with a bully.
Example sentences
  • To bully, both players simultaneously strike first the ground then each other's stick over the ball.
  • Every player shall be between the ball and his own goal line, except the two players who are bullying, who shall stand facing the side lines.
  • Just like bullying off in hockey this game should be fast and furious, but the puck and sticks stay low and fingers are best kept out of the way!

Origen

late 19th century (originally denoting a scrum in Eton football): of unknown origin.

More
  • People originally liked bullies. When it came into the English language in the 16th century, probably from an old Dutch word boele ‘lover’, bully was a term of endearment, much like ‘sweetheart’ or ‘darling’. At the end of the 17th century it was being used to mean ‘admirable or jolly’, and finally the more general sense of ‘first-rate’ developed. Today this survives only in the expression bully for you!, ‘well done! good for you!’ The usual modern sense dates from the late 17th century, probably from its use as an informal way of addressing a male friend, or referring to a ‘lad’ or ‘one of the boys’. The bully of bully beef is a mid 18th-century alteration of French bouilli ‘boiled’.

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