Hay 3 definiciones de bunk en inglés:

bunk1

Saltos de línea: bunk
Pronunciación: /bʌŋk
 
/

sustantivo

A narrow shelf-like bed, typically one of two or more arranged one on top of the other.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • Some of the crew went off-shift, stringing up hybrid bunks and hammocks belowdecks, the others continued working.
  • Inside it's designed as the cabin of a ship: the bunks used to be hammocks and, even when they changed to something more solid, they were famous for having three tiers.
  • Few pirates were in there, snoozing deeply in their bunks or hammocks.
Sinónimos

verbo

[no object] chiefly North American Volver al principio  
Sleep in a bunk or improvised bed, typically in shared quarters: they bunk together in the dormitory
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The Queenslanders were sleeping in cars or bunking in caravan parks.
  • ‘Sure,’ I said, ‘I probably should know what you do if we're going to be bunking together.’
  • Baker, Pease, Broadwater, and Lieutenant Charles B. Schofield bunked together in another tent.

Origen

mid 18th century: of unknown origin; perhaps related to bunker.

Definición de bunk en:

Obtener más de Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribirse para eliminar anuncios y acceder a los recursos premium

Palabra del día fioritura
Pronunciación: fɪˌɔːrɪˈt(j)ʊərə
noun
an embellishment of a melody...

Hay 3 definiciones de bunk en inglés:

bunk2

Saltos de línea: bunk
Pronunciación: /bʌŋk
 
/

sustantivo

[mass noun] informal
Nonsense: anyone with a brain cell would never believe such bunk
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • We like to believe that history is bunk because we don't like being bound by it.
  • That he believes his own bunk is the best joke of all.
  • Certainly there is as much bunk out there that needs to be unmasked as nonsense or lies.

Origen

early 20th century: abbreviation of bunkum.

Definición de bunk en:

Hay 3 definiciones de bunk en inglés:

bunk3

Saltos de línea: bunk
Pronunciación: /bʌŋk
 
/

verbo

[no object] (bunk off) British informal
Abscond or play truant from school or work: he bunked off school all week
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • It is just really to keep a high profile in case pupils who do not want to go to school think it's all gone quiet so they can bunk off again.
  • About 50,000 children in England bunk off school each day, despite the fact that millions of pounds have been spent on initiatives including town-centre truancy sweeps.
  • He was always trying to encourage me to bunk off and go hang out in the caff at the park, but I being the goody-goody that I was always refused convinced I'd get caught.
Sinónimos
play truant from, truant from, stay away from, not go to, be absent from, skip, avoid, shirk
British informal skive off
Irish informal mitch off
North American informal play hookey from, goof off, ditch, cut
Australian/New Zealand informal play the wag from
rare bag, hop the wag from

Origen

mid 19th century: of unknown origin.

Frases

do a bunk

informal Make a hurried or furtive departure or escape.
Más ejemplos en oraciones
  • The rules say you can work in pairs in the evenings after 8 p.m. so if you get into trouble, one of you can run interference while your oppo does a bunk to safety.
  • Many of them had to do a bunk as the Nazis became more powerful and they ended up in Hollywood.
  • She came to Britain in 1795 to meet her future husband (later George IV) who took one look, did a bunk and ordered a large brandy.
Sinónimos
run off, run away, make off, take off, take to one's heels, run for it, make a run for it, make a break for it, bolt, beat a (hasty) retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills, do a disappearing act
informal beat it, clear off, clear out, vamoose, skedaddle, split, cut and run, leg it, show a clean pair of heels, turn tail, scram
British informal do a runner, scarper, do a moonlight (flit)
North American informal light out, bug out, cut out, peel out, take a powder, skidoo
Australian informal go through, shoot through
vulgar slang bugger off
archaic fly

Definición de bunk en: